As of last week, Family Dollar had finally lived up to its end of the bargain: cutting the grass, trimming the hedges, removing dead trees and trimming the weeds around the sign.

As of last week, Family Dollar had finally lived up to its end of the bargain: cutting the grass, trimming the hedges, removing dead trees and trimming the weeds around the sign.

But not before months of complaints were made about the discount retailer's maintenance of the property, located at the northwest corner of Bethel and Dierker roads.

Some people in the neighborhood said the North Carolina-based company has violated a good-neighbor agreement with residents of the area.

"Prior to opening for business, Family Dollar will perform a general clean up and grooming of the grass and landscaped areas," says the accord with the Northwest Civic Association and the Lakes at Bethel Park condominium association, signed in January 2011.

Family Dollar opened the store in February 2012, ending a long vacancy for the property, 2136 Bethel Road.

Yet, landscaping measures have been few and far between, said Rosemarie Lisko, a member of the NWCA's board of trustees.

"It looked like it had never been taken care of, totally overgrown, very bad," she said.

Lisko said she personally made three phone calls to the Family Dollar's corporate headquarters, called an area supervisor and stopped by the store to complain.

Additional protests were made by a representative of the condo association, Lisko said.

Joshua Braverman, spokesman for the retail chain, said Family Dollar is trying to meet its obligations at the property.

"We're working very hard to meet and exceed the expectations of our neighbors on Bethel Road," Braverman said.

"We're working to get the area cleaned up and hope to have it resolved very quickly," he said.

Lisko said she was told the store would cut its grass once a month, per a maintenance agreement with a local landscaping firm.

"That doesn't work," Lisko said.

She said she's pleased that Family Dollar has taken some steps to clean up the property, but will continue to put pressure on the company to honor the pact.

"The first time I drive past there and I see it's overgrown again or not getting the attention it needs, I will be on the phone again calling the vice president of Family Dollar," she said.

"I want to be confident that they will live up to the good-neighbor agreement, but I have my doubts."

Lisko said she is not soured on good-neighbor agreements, as the civic association has had relative success with them.

"Without that, we have no recourse at all," she said.

"As I said before, they're only as good as the people who sign them."