Columbus State Community College is expected to begin work this summer on one of many academic buildings planned for its first campus in Delaware County.

Columbus State Community College is expected to begin work this summer on one of many academic buildings planned for its first campus in Delaware County.

The Liberty Township Zoning Commission on May 21 gave unanimous approval to the college's plans for the first academic building and parking and access roads. It will be the first phase of development on 108-acres owned by CSCC.

In addition to the main campus in downtown Columbus, the college operates at off-site locations including Dublin, Gahanna, Westerville, Groveport, Marysville, Delaware, Grove City and Plain City.

Those locations are mostly classroom space in office buildings; the Liberty Township project will be the college's first campus in Delaware County.

CSCC officials have said they expect to open the building by 2010.

The college, 5100 Cornerstone Drive, is expected to be visible from U.S. 23.

Access to the school is planned from Cornerstone Drive, which also will link to Greif Parkway.

The college's first 10.8-acres will be developed with other buildings coming over the next 20 to 30 years, according to documents filed with the Delaware County Regional Planning Commission.

A second building is planned for 2013.

CSCC owns the site at the southwest corner of U.S. Route 23 and Winter Road.

The project will be another first for Columbus State, one designed to be environmentally friendly.

It will include a LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) building. LEED is a building rating system developed in the 1990s by the U.S. Green Building Council and National Resources Defense Council, provides standards for environmentally conscious and sustainable construction.

CSCC rezoned the site in 2004 to planned commercial, which includes educational uses.

According to the college Web site, www.cscc.edu, more than 23,000 students are enrolled in either a technical career program or a two-year transfer program that allows students to start their bachelor's degree and transfer to a four-year school.

The project still must be approved by trustees and a hearing date has not yet been set.

In other zoning news, commission members started the meeting by recognizing zoning secretary Barbara Threlfall, who was attending her last meeting.

Threlfall recently resigned after serving as the township zoning secretary for 22 years.