Terry Fravel of Cheshire Road told Sunbury Village Council on Wednesday that changes are needed at the three "no turn on red" signs near General Rosecrans Elementary School.

Terry Fravel of Cheshire Road told Sunbury Village Council on Wednesday that changes are needed at the three "no turn on red" signs near General Rosecrans Elementary School.

Fravel's daughter received a $120 ticket for turning right on red. He said she and five other residents tried disputing the tickets in court but were told they had to pay the fees.

"They didn't see the sign, I don't think any of them were trying to get out of it," Fravel said.

Council unanimously voted on Sept. 1 to prohibit all right-hand turns at red traffic signals at Cherry Street and Miller Road during restricted hours.

Two weeks later, council voted to prohibit all right-hand turns at state Route 3 and South Miller Drive-Granville Street and at Heartland Meadows and South Miller Drive, also during restricted hours.

Fravel said the traffic signs are needed at the intersections but the "no turn on red" signs have several problems.

"Some of them are in the lane where you are going straight through," Fravel said. "I think the signs being at the side of the road would be a lot better."

He also said the restricted times listed on the signs are hard to read.

"It wasn't fair to the people who drive these roads every day ... to take that all in," Fravel said.

Mayor Len Weatherby told Fravel that council would look into the matter.

"It did happen quickly and the idea was to protect children," Weatherby said, "I think as we go through this we might do some tweaking on the lettering or the placement."

Village administrator Dave Martin said drivers have had ample time to switch their driving habits.

He said police didn't issue any tickets for nearly a month after the signs went up.

"I agree that the print is too small on the times, but I also think that once you see the times you know what they are," Martin said. "When you see a sign that says "no turn on red," wouldn't you wait until you were sure as opposed to just saying 'Oh, I can't read those numbers' and just go?"

Councilman Bill Metzler agreed, saying it's about being accountable for your own actions.

"The first time I went through there I didn't know the signs were up, but it only took me that one time," Metzler said. "But, I think we must speak to personal responsibility here, too. If we went four weeks without ticketing anybody, I think that's a pretty fair time period."

Martin said police have issued 30 tickets since Oct. 22. The traffic signs went up Sept. 29.

Fravel said the "no turn on red" signs might have been better received if more advanced warning had been available.

"When a different traffic pattern is there usually I see in different cities and stuff that they put up the sign ahead of time that a different traffic pattern is going to be made," Fravel said.

Village engineer Wes Hall said he didn't believe that was the case.

"Typically only stop signs and traffic signals require advance warning," Hall said. "Things like "no turn on red" and speed limit signs and things like that are typically not required, but we could check."

"I just think other things could have been done to help that process along," Fravel said.

Ticketed drivers are fined $120 for turning right on red. They can try to fight it in court but will owe $55 in court fees.