Delaware County engineer Chris Bauserman's office is hoping LED flashing stop signs reduce accidents at two intersections on Cheshire Road.

Delaware County engineer Chris Bauserman's office is hoping LED flashing stop signs reduce accidents at two intersections on Cheshire Road.

Eight such signs were installed in December, at the intersections of Cheshire and Old State roads and Cheshire and Africa roads.

"The LED-enhanced stop signs were installed after the engineer's office conducted a safety study in response to two recent fatal crashes at these intersections," said Rob Riley, chief deputy engineer. "The study examined the existing signs at the intersection, the crash history and traffic volumes."

A fatal crash occurred at Cheshire and Africa roads Oct. 4, 2011. A fatal crash occurred at Cheshire and Old State roads Oct. 25, 2011, following another at the intersection in 2006.

About 9,000 vehicles daily pass through the Cheshire-Old State intersection, and about 7,600 pass through the Cheshire-Africa intersection.

A four-way stop is adequate for the amount of traffic at both intersections, Riley said, and an intersection upgrade isn't required.

The crash histories at both intersections confirm a general failure to recognize and comply with the four-way stop, Riley said.

The engineer's office identified several countermeasures that could help reduce crashes, Riley said, including "larger or additional stop signs, flashing beacons placed on the 'stop ahead' signs, an overhead flashing red light, rumble strips, LED-enhanced signs, or reconstruction of the intersection into a roundabout. The LED-enhanced stop signs were ultimately selected because they are a cost-effective solution that are proven to work."

The signs are solar-powered. Each sign has a solar panel and small battery. The batteries can hold enough of a charge to power the signs through several cloudy days in a row, Riley said; the batteries cost $2,000 each.

"This is the first time the county engineer has installed the LED signs," Riley said. ODOT installed such signs at Fancher Road and state Route 605, to help correct a pattern of crashes caused by motorists running the stop signs.

"While these LED signs aren't appropriate for every situation, we hope that this technology can save lives where it is used," Riley said.