Residents are invited to share family stories during a special program about a re-created 1930s-era farmstead in Delaware, set to open later this fall.

Residents are invited to share family stories during a special program about a re-created 1930s-era farmstead in Delaware, set to open later this fall.

Robin Mayes, a farm educator for Gallant Farms Preserve, will share photos of the replica farmstead and talk about plans during a presentation set for 7 p.m. Sept. 10 at the Powell Liberty Historical Society's Martin-Perry House, 103 E. Olentangy St. in Powell. Mayes asks attendees to share family stories from the Great Depression during the program.

Donations of kitchen utensils and bookcases from the period also will be accepted to help furnish the farmstead, which tentatively is set to open for viewing in October at 2150 Buttermilk Hill Road.

The farm will include a replica farmhouse, a large barn that will serve as a meeting facility and display space, gardens, a fishing pond and a row-crop field. Ground was broken on the project in the spring.

Experts helped to design the historically accurate farmstead, which will represent a "typical" farmstead and was not modeled after any particular farm, said Preservation Parks spokeswoman Sue Hagan.

"We worked with people who know a lot about the history of the period to help us come up with a good representation of what a family farm would have looked like in that era," she said.

Ultimately, educational programming and field-trip opportunities will be developed for the farmstead.