As developers and city officials gathered last week to break ground at the future site of the Powell Grand rental community, bulldozers already were moving in the background.

As developers and city officials gathered last week to break ground at the future site of the Powell Grand rental community, bulldozers already were moving in the background.

The scene reflected the intent of developers Margello Development Co. and Schottenstein Real Estate Group to move quickly to make the project a reality.

Powell City Council voted in December to approve the proposal for the 308-unit rental community planned for 39 acres southeast of Sawmill Parkway's intersection with Seldom Seen Road. Officials conducted the groundbreaking ceremony Friday, June 10.

Brian Schottenstein, chief operating officer for Schottenstein Real Estate Group, said the goal is for models and the community's clubhouse to be open by the end of 2016. He said the entire project should be completed within two years.

Schottenstein said Powell Grand's amenities and high quality will help it stand out compared to other developments.

"It's going to be the nicest rental community in Delaware County," he said.

Powell grand will feature ranch-, townhouse- and apartment-style units available for rent. Developers have said the three styles are vital to the community's success because they appeal to potential residents of various ages and mobility levels.

Amenities at the site will include a dog park, a swimming pool and pickleball courts.

Vince Margello, president of Margello Development Co., said the property's development also will lead to additional bike-path connections in the area.

Developers have eschewed the term senior housing while promoting Powell Grand, describing it as a community for "active adults" instead. Margello said one of the target markets for the community will be empty nesters who want to move to a smaller residence but remain in the city they love.

The Powell Grand property sits within a tax-increment financing district. TIF districts are funding mechanisms that allow municipalities to divert property-tax revenue from future improvements to a site to pay for nearby infrastructure work

Under an agreement between the developer and the city, about $3.3 million in TIF funding and direct contributions from the developer will go toward infrastructure and park improvements in the project area.

The development will serve as one source of funding for the planned Park at Seldom Seen on the north side of Seldom Seen Road near the development.

Gary Schottenstein, CEO of Schottenstein Real Estate Group, said his firm wants the development project to be beneficial to its neighbors and city residents.

"We want to be a really good corporate citizen," he said.

Gary Schottenstein said his firm has received a "tremendous outpouring of calls" about the project in recent months. He said the firm's goal is to start leasing for the community by the end of summer.