A vendor working to develop a red-light camera system for the city of Pickerington said he remains hopeful city council will give his proposed plan a green light.

A vendor working to develop a red-light camera system for the city of Pickerington said he remains hopeful city council will give his proposed plan a green light.

Since April, the city has been working with officials from Redflex Traffic Systems to develop a plan to install a photo speed-enforcement system at intersections along state Route 256.

In August, however, it became clear that Ohio Department of Transportation regulations will keep the cameras from one of the targeted intersections at state Route 256 and Interstate 70.

ODOT officials said the agency lacks the statutory authority to install the cameras on its signals.

But Redflex's Ohio representative, Joe Moore, said the remaining target intersections -- state Route 256 at Refugee Road, state Route 204 and Diley Road -- are enough to build a viable program.

Moore said his company has conducted traffic studies at each of the intersections and found plenty of violations.

"There were some significant violations (at Interstate 70), but there are other significant intersections in the city that are not under the control of ODOT and we are committed to placing our equipment there, if the city still wishes to do so," Moore said. "We've noticed that's a very, very busy roadway and it has significant speed patterns we may be able to address for the city."

The Redflex study showed that during an eight-hour period, there were about 50 red-light violations at the intersection of Route 256 with Refugee and Diley roads. At Route 204, there were about 19 violations during the same time period.

Even without a camera at Interstate 70, Police Chief Michael Taylor said he wants to proceed with a red-light enforcement program in Pickerington.

Taylor said he investigated photo red-light enforcement systems for about two years before inviting Redflex to Pickerington. He said the system allows a level of police enforcement current city budgets do not allow.

"If they are willing to still do it, I'm certainly all for it," Taylor said. "My job is to provide safety and that certainly would help."

Pickerington City Council's safety committee continues to study Taylor's request for council approval of a contract with Redflex. One question being explored is whether the cameras will cause more rear-end collisions and traffic backups.

Redflex operates red-light programs in Columbus, Dayton, Springfield and Toledo. In each of those cities, Moore said, there has been a decrease in rear-end collisions at intersections with the cameras.

"It's not a factual statement that rear-end crashes go up," Moore said. "They are all reporting a significant decrease in crashes of any kind."

Taylor said he is willing to accept an initial slowdown in traffic as people adjust their driving habits.

"But after a while, when people know the cameras are there, they'll slow down and stop for the light," he said. "The way it is now, we have hundreds of people running a red light every day. Sooner or later, we're going to have a fatality."