Several members of the Trinity Family Life Center in Pickerington are going to build a handicap-accessible ramp at a Pataskala home.

Several members of the Trinity Family Life Center in Pickerington are going to build a handicap-accessible ramp at a Pataskala home.

The ramp is for Dolores Bowles, who broke her foot and has been confined to a wheelchair, said her daughter, Sue Bowles.

Sue Bowles spoke to Pataskala City Council last week, requesting that council waive the permit fee for installing the ramp.

"She wants to be mobile," Bowles said of her mother but added that her mother cannot get in and out of the house in her wheelchair. "There's no way to get her out," she said.

Bowles called it a safety issue.

Pataskala Mayor Steve Butcher said the city has an ordinance that waives the fee for installation of a handicap ramp.

Councilman Bernard Brush said, however, that some verification of a disability is required.

The church group that will install the ramp is called Men Able To Serve or MATS. Gary Dinnell, a member of MATS, said the group is working with the city to obtain a permit so they may begin construction.

"We formed the group to do things for widows, elderly couples, servicemen's wives and single moms," Dinnell said.

In the past year, since MATS has been in existence, the group has remodeled a home for a blind couple, fixed a floor that had water damage, installed a water heater, cleaned gutters, trimmed shrubs and completed other minor home repairs.

Dinnell said the church formed the group after seeing a need to minister to its own parishioners.

"It's for the needy in our congregation," he said.

The MATS group now has 11 members, all with some experience in home repair. Dinnell said one does plumbing; another does electrical work; still another can do drawings required for permits, such as the one Bowles requires.

Sue Bowles said her mother and brother both are members of the church. She said the church and Pataskala city employees were great to work with, providing assistance that will help until her mother is back on her feet.

"It gives her back some of her independence and her mobility," Bowles said of the ramp.

lwince@thisweeknews.com