Pickerington officials are expected to OK a $75,000 contract next week to examine the city's sanitary sewer system.

Pickerington officials are expected to OK a $75,000 contract next week to examine the city's sanitary sewer system.

On April 6, Pickerington City Council is expected to hear a third reading of legislation to authorize Floyd Browne Group to conduct the first citywide study of Pickerington's sanitary sewer system.

The legislation twice has received unanimous support from city council and is expected to gain final approval on April 6.

The associated work, which could cost up to $75,000, will help officials better determine where sanitary lines are located throughout the city, as well as analyze capacity in those lines. The latter effort will help Pickerington officials plan future residential and commercial development.

"The sanitary sewer master plan will update the city's mapping of its sewer system and bring the mapping into the digital age," city engineer Greg Bachman said. "Currently, the city has an assortment of paper maps of our sanitary sewer lines and manholes.

"A digital map of our system will be created," he said. "Drainage areas for existing and future sewer flows will be delineated. Flow monitors will be placed in key locations in our system. A computer model of our sanitary sewer system will be created and calibrated."

Bachman said the city recently attempted to examine sanitary sewer lines in Olde Pickerington Village. A more comprehensive analysis has never been conducted, however.

"We will use the information to plan for needed and cost-effective improvements," he said. "The flow monitors and computer mapping will show areas where we have or will have capacity problems. We will use that information to design projects to reduce inflow and infiltration into our older sewers or build new sanitary sewers.

"Also, if a new development is proposed for an area, we can run the computer model and see what improvements would be needed for the development and what would be needed to maintain or improve protection to our residents."

Bachman said the study is expected to be completed this fall.

The sanitary sewer study would follow work PIckerington already has initiated to study its water lines and capacity.

Recently, the city authorized a $50,000 study to create a water master plan study.

"All of our fire hydrants and water valves will be located with GPS equipment," Bachman said. "A computer model of our water system will be created. The computer model of our water system will allow us to calculate the water pressure and amount of water available anywhere in our system.

"Estimates of the available water supply from our wells will be updated. Projections of future water needs will be calculated."

Bachman said the water master plan information will be used to plan for needed and cost-effective improvements, as well as help plan future development.

"For instance, if water pressure is low in an area, we can run scenarios for reinforcing the existing water grid," he said. "We can then plan and properly size the needed improvements."

The water master plan study also is expected to be completed this fall.

nellis@thisweeknews.com