The recent storms, which brought heavy winds and resulted in prolonged blackouts for some residents and businesses throughout Central Ohio, cost both the city of Pickerington and Violet Township upwards of $25,000 each.

The recent storms, which brought heavy winds and resulted in prolonged blackouts for some residents and businesses throughout Central Ohio, cost both the city of Pickerington and Violet Township upwards of $25,000 each.

Clean-up efforts after two storms which swept through the region June 29 and July 1 resulted in approximately 20 hours of overtime for Violet Township crews, according to Greg Butcher, township engineer.

Most of that work centered on clearing fallen trees or tree limbs from township roadways, about five of which were deemed impassable and were temporarily closed in the hours after the violent storm fronts moved through the community.

Even two weeks after the storms, Butcher said, the township has been busy digging out.

"For the last two weeks, we have dedicated a crew to clearing debris from the Violet Township-maintained right of way," Butcher said.

"This includes debris that had fallen next to the road, as well as debris that had fallen on private property that was hauled to the curb or edge of pavement by the property owner.

"This work is being done during normal working hours and should be complete by July 20."

Butcher estimated the recovery work cost the township $25,000 in employee overtime and for other expenses, such as the rental of a wood chipper.

The same can be said for the city of Pickerington, according to City Service Director Ed Drobina.

Drobina said city crews devoted more than 176 hours to cleanup efforts, including nearly 77 hours of employee overtime.

The extra work, he said, cost the city $25,000.

"(There was) approximately $2,500 overtime," he said.

"The only damage besides trees that I know of is some fence damage at (the city's) water plant and service department, which has not been repaired yet."

Both Butcher and Drobina said they are hopeful some of that money will be recouped through federal emergency-response assistance programs.

"The Fairfield County Emergency Management Agency is coordinating the assessment of assistance from the federal government," Butcher said.

"We are tracking our cleanup costs should it be determined that we will be eligible for reimbursement," he said.

"The city will apply for (Federal Emergency Management Agency) assistance if available," Drobina said.

At a July 5 Violet Township trustees meeting, township fire Chief John Eisel said the two storms kept his department, which responds to fires and provides ambulance transport and emergency medical assistance, "abnormally busy."

"Through those three days (June 29-July 1), we responded to 81 incidents, which was more than double what we normally do," Eisel said.