Reynoldsburg school officials are still reviewing information gathered during a series of Reynoldsburg Reach meetings that concluded two weeks ago, but they say preliminary results give them some idea of what residents want to see when a new high school and elementary school are built.

Reynoldsburg school officials are still reviewing information gathered during a series of Reynoldsburg Reach meetings that concluded two weeks ago, but they say preliminary results give them some idea of what residents want to see when a new high school and elementary school are built.

According to preliminary data, a total of 759 people, including community members, teachers, students and district staff, attended the 31 Reynoldsburg Reach meetings. Of that number, 609 filled out a questionnaire asking them to identify their favorite option for the new high school, while 556 did the same for the elementary school.

High school option 2 garnered the most votes -- 235, or 39 percent. It calls for housing grades 9 and 10 in one high school and grades 11 and 12 in a second school.

The district would retain one high school identity. High school option 3 garnered 36 percent, or 220 votes, from participants.

In option 3, both high schools would become "small schools under one roof" where six small "schools" would be housed on two campuses.

Option 1, which called for two comprehensive high schools for grades 9-12, with similar offerings and their own identities, received 130 votes, or 21 percent.

Twenty-four people, or 4 percent of survey respondents, voted for a hybrid school.

The hybrid concept was introduced during the meetings from the participants who thought some elements from all 3 options should be put into one school.

The specifics of those elements should be revealed once the written data is reviewed at the end of this month.

Attendance for all high school options would likely be determined by geographic boundaries.

Participants' preferences were clearer when it came to the elementary school. Option 1 received 305 votes, or 55 percent. It calls for building a traditional school offering programs and instruction substantially similar to that provided in the district's existing elementary schools. Attendance boundaries would be drawn along geographical lines.

Elementary option 2, which suggested a school offering a specialized curriculum where attendance would be based on student/parent choice, as in a magnet school, received 45 percent or 251 votes.

Assistant Superintendent Dan Hoffman said although the quantitative data from the Reynoldsburg Reach surveys are in, it is important to review the written comments, or qualitative data, also. Results from that information won't be available until at least June 30, he said.

Hoffman said once that information is in, school officials will be able to present a more accurate report to the Reynoldsburg Board of Education in July.

"Until we review the written comments from those meetings, I don't know that we are fully informed," he said.

Superintendent Steve Dackin agreed.

"You can do numbers and numbers say one thing, but we need to really get a sense of what people are thinking behind their thoughts," Dackin said. "From my perspective, and before I do any recommendation to the board, I want to see the logic people were using to put out the preferences they put out."

The new elementary school and high school, to be located at the northeast corner of Summit and Refugee roads, are expected to be built in 2010 with money from a $56-million bond issue and 0.5-mill tax levy voters approved in March, plus another $55-million from the Ohio School Facilities Commission. Some of the money also will be used to renovate existing district facilities.

dowen@thisweeknews.com