Reynoldsburg City Council Monday night authorized Engineer Director Jim Miller to advertise for bids for the 2008 sanitary sewer televising and cleaning project covering the Brookside and Old Briar Cliff subdivisions.

Reynoldsburg City Council Monday night authorized Engineer Director Jim Miller to advertise for bids for the 2008 sanitary sewer televising and cleaning project covering the Brookside and Old Briar Cliff subdivisions.

The project is expected to begin the first week of August and last up to 90 days. Residents of the area will be notified by door hangers 48 hours before the project is to begin.

Miller said the project is the first phase in a four-year plan to take video surveillance of and evaluate 215,000 linear feet of troublesome sanitary sewer lines throughout the city in order to meet upcoming Environmental Protection Agency regulations.

The EPA is asking municipalities to sign an agreement requiring them to evaluate and identify deficiencies in their sewer systems within three years.

Miller said the three-year time clock begins on Jan. 1, 2009. So far, he said, the city has yet to receive the agreement from the EPA.

"In anticipation of the EPA agreement, we're getting a head start on it early to spread it out in four years rather than three," Miller said.

After the three years is up, the city must provide a 10-year plan to the EPA indicating how they will repair all of the deficiencies they found.

Miller said bids are being advertised for the first phase of the project and with a deadline to receive by 9 a.m. Wednesday, July 9, he expects to announce who will get the contract by July 21.

The project will span 44,791 lineal feet of sanitary sewer line throughout the Brookside and Old Briar Cliff subdivisions and cost an estimated $91,000. Work is scheduled to begin in early August.

Miller said during the project, crews drop a video camera into a manhole and the camera is then navigated through the sewer lines, recording the inside conditions of the 8-inch pipes.

The video captured is then transferred to a DVD and sent to Miller, who reviews the footage and determines the condition rating on the pipes.

"Sewers are havens for tree roots. Tree roots, grass roots and bush roots love to live in sewers, and they go through the joints and go through cracks," Miller said.

'When you have a sewer with a lot of roots in it it restricts the flow of the sewer, and you can get sewer back-ups, and that's bad," he said.

"When we televise the sewer we will be looking for obstructions in the sewer and when you find roots you send in a cutter and cut it all up and blow it all out with water," he said.

Miller said the city has between 700,000 and 800,000 feet of sewer pipe and 215,000 feet of it is considered troublesome or high maintenance.

"Because of age, they (pipes) sometimes can collapse and the design life of a sewer pipe is approximately is 30 to 50 years," Miller said. "The pipes we're looking at first are at least 50 years old."

He said this project fits into his proposed Capital Improvement Plan for the city. If a sewer line is found that is completely collapsed, it will be put on the plan and be scheduled for repairs, he said.