The Reynoldsburg Board of Education will hold a town meeting at 7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 9, in the high school cafeteria to seek residents' advice on the district's financial future.

The Reynoldsburg Board of Education will hold a town meeting at 7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 9, in the high school cafeteria to seek residents' advice on the district's financial future.

Superintendent Steve Dackin said the district's future rests on what happens with the state budget and whether a May levy is passed.

"We have a serious dilemma, and I think what we're interested in doing is going out to the community to say 'help us think through this dilemma, here's what's going on' and what you think we ought to do?'" he said.

He said state officials probably won't reveal the actual percentage in expected funding cuts to schools until after the Feb. 19 deadline to file levy requests for the May ballot.

Dackin predicts the state will cut its allocations to local districts by 15 percent -- a move that would cost Reynoldsburg schools about $4-million, he said. That does not include any other budget adjustments that would happen if a May levy is rejected.

A loss at the polls this spring could bring an additional $11-million in cuts, he said.

"Let me make this real: If it comes to the $15-million in reductions, kids lose all art, music and physical education, K through 8," Dackin said last week.

Possibilities for reaching $15-million worth of cuts -- if that is the amount needed -- include laying off between 32 and 94 staff positions, including 44 core teachers; eliminating art, physical education and music in K-8 classes, cutting administration days and central office support staff hours and days; eliminating foreign language courses in the junior high and high school; having athletics/extracurricular activities become self-funding or eliminated.

Other possibilities include reducing transportation to state minimum standards, including limits on busing for K-6 students and none for high school students.

He said officials are still looking at options internally that could influence any budget cuts. An administrative wage freeze will go into effect next year, regardless of whether a May levy is passed, and Dackin said he has asked the teachers union to consider concessions as well.