Reynoldsburg voters will decide the fate of two levies in the May 5 primary election and will choose three Republicans to appear on the November ballot for at-large council seats.

Reynoldsburg voters will decide the fate of two levies in the May 5 primary election and will choose three Republicans to appear on the November ballot for at-large council seats.

Issue 14 is the Reynoldsburg school district's 15.6-mill operating levy that if approved, would generate $12,012,047 annually for the district, according to the Franklin County Auditor's Office.

It would cost homeowners an additional $477.75 annually per $100,000 of home valuation.

Reynoldsburg school officials have cut more than $6.5-million from the district budget over the past three years. The board of education agreed in March to save another $6.4-million by cutting more than 100 full-time positions for the next school year if the levy fails. Hours for the administrative and support staff would be reduced, class sizes would be increased and a number of courses would be cut, including junior high Spanish courses, the Trailblazers alternative program and art, music and physical education classes for kindergarten through sixth grade. Extracurricular programs, including sports, would have to be cut or become self-funded and transportation could be reduced to state minimums.

Superintendent Steve Dackin has said the district guarantees if the levy is passed, it will last for five years.

Opponents have said that while they may understand the value of a good school district to a community, their own finances make it hard for them to approve an increase in taxes.

Voters will choose three of the four Republicans on the May 5 ballot -- Nathan Burd, Ron Stake, Barth R. Cotner and Christopher Long -- to continue on to the November general election in an effort to be elected to fill three at-large city council seats. Stake and Cotner are incumbents.

Only two Democrats, Donna Shirey and Cornelius McGrady III filed for the three spots in the Democratic primary, so their names will automatically appear on the November ballot.

Also on the May 5 ballot is Issue 1, a 10-year, 0.75-percent property tax for Franklin County Metro Parks. If approved, it would replace a 0.65-mill levy that expires at year's end and would increase property taxes from $13 to $23 per $100,000 of home valuation.

According to the park district, the estimated $21.5-million the levy would generate annually would be used to increase educational programs for children and adults, create 50 miles of new trails, maintain the 15 existing parks and create three new parks over the next 10 years: one between Groveport and Canal Winchester, one in Plain Township north of New Albany and one along the Scioto River east of Grove City.

dowen@thisweeknews.com