Just over one year after graduating from Reynoldsburg High School, David Hedrick announced his candidacy to run for one of three seats up for grabs on the board of education this fall.

Just over one year after graduating from Reynoldsburg High School, David Hedrick announced his candidacy to run for one of three seats up for grabs on the board of education this fall.

Those three seats are currently held by board President Cheryl Max, vice president Andrew Swope and Jim Slonaker.

Hedrick, 19, has been a city resident for 13 years and was a co-chair of the campaign in support of the district's 15.6-mill operating levy that voters rejected on May 5.

He served as president of the RHS marching band and is currently studying political science at The Ohio State University.

Hedrick was born in Bluffton, Ind. His family moved to Reynoldsburg in time for him to begin first grade.

"I grew up in Reynoldsburg ... this is home to me," Hedrick said.

He said his drive to be involved in the schools is not just to run for a seat on the board of education but to be involved with the political process.

"Politics have such a bad name and I think that really needs to be changed," Hedrick said. "Politics can be a good thing and we can really make a difference in people's lives if we're honest and we have integrity I want to at least do as much as I can to bring that back to American politics."

Hedrick said he has named his campaign "Sensible Citizens for David Hedrick" with the slogan "Reinventing superior schools. Recharging our community."

He said among the issues the board of education can get better at are accountability to the taxpayers, being smart fiscally and communicating with the community.

"I think we really need to stop the fighting and the battle lines with the faculty and the staff," Hedrick said. "We've got to talk to them, we've got to be sensible, we can't just say, 'this is our position; take it or leave it.' We've got to cooperate and bring common sense back in our leadership."

He said the Reynoldsburg school district is in its current financial position because of the current economy, but also because the district should not have waited so long to ask for an operating levy.

"I know you've got a cash balance in the bank, but you've got to talk to the community and that is where the communication problem lies," Hedrick said. "You've got to talk to the community and say 'hey, you know what? If we don't do this now, it's going to be huge in two years.'

"They can say all they want that 'oh, we're not going to ask for a levy with a cash balance in the bank,' but you know money is running out, you have a five-year forecast, you know you're going to need more money, because you just built five schools," he said.

Hedrick said his goal if elected is not to stress the community, but if another operating levy is not passed and more cuts come down the line, the district could wind up in fiscal emergency.

"The state steps in and takes control of our district, which means we transfer a lot of power form the local community to the state, and that isn't good for the community," he said. "We need to keep the power here in the local community, and an operating levy keeps power here, because we know how to run our community better than the state of Ohio does."

dowen@thisweeknews.com