City officials are adding another tool to Reynoldsburg's code enforcement policy by reviving a nuisance abatement board that has been nonexistent for the past several years.

City officials are adding another tool to Reynoldsburg's code enforcement policy by reviving a nuisance abatement board that has been nonexistent for the past several years.

Mayor Brad McCloud has appointed Charles McGrath, vice chairman of the city's planning commission, as the chairman of the board.

McGrath said has so far chosen three of the four nuisance board members: Reynoldsburg development director Lucas Haire, who also sits on the board of zoning and building appeals and the planning commission; Jim Comeaux, chairman of the planning commission; and Norm Brusk, a member of the city's board of zoning and building appeals.

He said the fourth member has not been determined yet but should be in place within the next month.

McGrath said the nuisance abatement board is a good idea and will work hard to handle any major problems that may arise in the future.

"I think it is something that is sorely needed," he said. "We had that board before and we got a lot of things done. We don't have to be on top of minor things. We will be handling most of the things of significant problems to the city."

McCloud said once all members have been chosen, the board should be activated within a month.

Haire said the main function of the nuisance abatement board is to handle issues with properties that have been deemed a major problem after not being cleaned up under the current code enforcement process.

He said the hope is that the current code enforcement process will continue to work, but the nuisance abatement board will be in place as an extra tool when needed.

"It's a good way to handle the major issues," Councilman Mel Clemens said. "It's about working with people, really. You bring them in and if there's ways to help them, we help them, but it's also a way to get buildings torn down or things that need to be removed from a property."

Haire said the city would like to use the board "for the major nuisances that we can't get results on in other ways -- if they're not responsive to code enforcement, or properties that have been abandoned."

The nuisance abatement board will be notified of major nuisances from code enforcement officers' reports or through residents' complaints, which are reported to safety service director Pam Boratyn, according to Haire..

Under the current process, if a code enforcement officer sees a violation on a property, the officer notifies the owners to have the problem fixed.

Once a nuisance issue or property is reported to the nuisance abatement board, it will have the ability to hold hearings and force property owners to fix the problem within a certain period of time.

If that doesn't happen, then the board will also be able to have the problem fixed and assess the cost to the property owners.

McCloud said Boratyn will ultimately decide whether a property is a major nuisance or is violating city code.