Reynoldsburg City Council did not vote as expected Monday on an ordinance that would establish new zoning codes for multifamily developments.

Reynoldsburg City Council did not vote as expected Monday on an ordinance that would establish new zoning codes for multifamily developments.

Councilman Doug Joseph said he sent the legislation back to the service committee because "an interested party" who could not attend the meeting wanted a chance to talk about the proposed changes before the full council took a final vote.

He would not identify the person.

"The person asked to speak to the entire ordinance and what his issues are I do not even know," Joseph said. "That will be discussed at the next service committee meeting. I do not want to mention his name until he comes forward and speaks before service committee meeting next week. I don't think that would be fair to him or anyone else that is involved with the process."

Council has heard two readings of the ordinance since it was introduced on Nov. 9. It was sent back to the service committee because of questions from representatives of the Building Industry Association of Central Ohio and concerns expressed by development companies that the ordinance did not include language to "grandfather" projects currently under way in Reynoldsburg.

Since then, the ordinance language was amended to say the new zoning changes, if approved by council, would not affect existing development projects.

Councilman Mel Clemens proposed amending the city's zoning requirements last year in an attempt to stop owners of condominiums from renting them if they are unable to sell them.

Under the current city zoning requirements for multiple-family districts, the owner of a condominium for sale can legally rent or lease it without seeking further permission or any rezoning approval from the city.

Clemens said he wanted to bring that to a stop.

He said the ordinance, if ultimately approved, does not outlaw construction of new apartments or condos in Reynoldsburg, but it sets standards that would make them more expensive to build, thus creating less of a chance they would be rented or leased.

The proposed additions to the city's multi-family zoning code, would:

Require all structures to be built of a minimum 75-percent traditional and natural materials, such as clay bricks, stone, cultured stone, stucco, and wood or fiber cement board siding.

Set the maximum number of dwelling units per building at four. There is no limit under the current zoning requirements.

Require that all major site plans for developments in multi-family districts contain a minimum of 15-percent open space.

"Since this is not an emergency issue and I've said I wanted everyone to have a chance to weigh in on this issue that affected them, I went ahead and sent it back to the service committee," Joseph said after Monday's council meeting. "He can have a chance to speak to that issue next week."

dowen@thisweeknews.com