Reynoldsburg City Councilman Mel Clemens has never been a fan of Mayor Brad McCloud's request for increased authority to fire those who hold three directors' jobs without council approval.

Reynoldsburg City Councilman Mel Clemens has never been a fan of Mayor Brad McCloud's request for increased authority to fire those who hold three directors' jobs without council approval.

Monday night, he made his opinion of the three ordinances up for a final vote very clear.

"I would be remorseful if I didn't tell you how I really feel about them they really remind me of three piles of manure covered with whipped cream and strawberries it makes them look a lot better but it still smells," Clemens said.

Council approved all three pieces of legislation by 5-2 votes, with Clemens and Councilman Barth Cotner casting the "no" votes.

As a result, McCloud can now fire the directors of engineering, development and human resources without seeking council approval.

Before the votes were cast, Clemens said the best thing to do would be to not make any changes because this would give council oversight on the hiring and firing of the three positions.

"This has to do with all three ordinances, and it has no reflection on Mayor McCloud, his staff, or how he operates his staff," Clemens said. "I just feel they're turning the future into political appointments that would be political hack jobs and I don't think that is something we need from the city."

Cotner also said his vote was no reflection on McCloud, but he said the new legislation concerns him because the positions are too important to the city to not have council involved.

"They're too important to the city to risk losing over an election and become a political appointment, and I think they are professionals that deserve our respect," Cotner said.

"I'd like to see a partnership between council and the mayor working on this together and (to) enable us to keep good people that are in good positions doing very good work for our city," he said.

Council President Williams Hills reiterated his opposition to the legislation.

"I only get to vote if there is a 3-3 tie, but if I had that opportunity, I would certainly vote against this," Hills said.

He said in the late 1990s, when he was on council, he voted in favor of having ordinances in place requiring a council vote on whether the people holding these jobs should be fired so the there could be continuity in those services for the citizens of Reynoldsburg.

"In my mind, if something is working, you don't change it and in this case, if it needs to be changed, it should be changed in the 2012 Charter Review Commission. It shouldn't be changed by a vote of council," Hills said.

City attorney Jed Hood agreed with Hills.

"If it ain't broke, don't fix it," he said. "Our departments are so minimally staffed, if we had a change in an election, then our engineer team goes. We have no other engineers and no other staff in the engineering department. Human resources is the same.

"That is the unique nature of living in Reynoldsburg: We do more with less and we pride ourselves in doing that, so we don't have three engineers like big towns, we have one person," he said.

Councilwoman Leslie Kelly backed her approval for the legislation by pointing out that currently, the safety-service and parks and recreation director positions are appointed by the mayor but don't need approval from council. She said essentially, the three director positions in question also should be treated the same way.