City auditor Richard Harris presented a $13-million general fund budget for council approval Monday, in compliance with a largely defunct state law that requires political subdivisions to report to the county government.

City auditor Richard Harris presented a $13-million general fund budget for council approval Monday, in compliance with a largely defunct state law that requires political subdivisions to report to the county government.

"This was done in the early 1900s, when the state put in the 10 mills of inside (property) tax," Harris said. "Everybody had to send in a budget and the counties then would divide it up."

The law was later changed to fix the distribution permanently, Harris said, without the need for an annual action.

Of the three counties to which Reynoldsburg reports - Licking, Fairfield and Franklin - only Licking and Fairfield ask that the tax budget be submitted. Harris said the process is repeated in the fall, after the county tax commission reviews the tax budget and then council passes a resolution accepting the commission's recommendations.

Despite the perfunctory legal status of the effort, Harris said one purpose served by the budget process is that it fixes firm planning numbers for council.

"The one thing that does come out of this every year is the amount of money we have available to spend," he said. "What I think this is really for is the small townships and such; it forces you to look at how much money you have to spend next year. You have to stay within certain constraints."

The largest revenue component for Reynoldsburg is $8.5-million in income tax, followed by $1.4-million in state subsidies. The largest expenditures are $7.5-million for police services, followed by $3.1-million in general government administration and $1.5-million in community environment.

In other business Monday, council approved a change in zoning for 1755 Lancaster Ave. from multi-family dwelling use to neighborhood commercial use.

Matt Hansen, city planning administrator, said the proposed use is for a doctor's office to be known as the Serenity Center, offering clinical hypnosis, massage, yoga and the services of a social worker. The existing house is not expected to be significantly changed, Hansen said.

Council also heard the second reading of a resolution that would allow Mayor Brad McCloud to apply for an as-yet-unspecified amount of Ohio Public Works Commission funds to subsidize repaving five lanes of Brice Road from Interstate 70 to Main Street.

"That's a bunch of lane miles," McCloud said.