An approved levy and the latest round of budget cuts don't mean Reynoldsburg school district officials can stop paying close attention to spending.

An approved levy and the latest round of budget cuts don't mean Reynoldsburg school district officials can stop paying close attention to spending.

The state budget is still the wild card.

Treasurer Tammy Miller said last week she has no idea what state lawmakers will do when it comes to education funding.

"But the state budget is very important to Reynoldsburg's financial stability," she said.

Although voter approval of an operating levy in May helps, Miller said the district still needs to watch its budget, which will also be affected by what happens with the state budget for fiscal years 2012 and 2013.

"The state has already started that process and their decisions will impact our state funding, which is roughly half of our funding," Miller said.

"The state has three options," she said. "They could cut school districts, leave us the same or give us an increase. I can't speculate what the state is going to do, but I would think it would never be an increase."

Miller told the board of education at its July 20 meeting that the Reynoldsburg school district has finished making the $3-million in cuts officials planned for the next school year.

In addition, she said, the district ended the fiscal year in better financial shape than anticipated, with nine days of cash flow, or about $1.4-million, instead of just five days of cash flow.

This was mostly due to a spending freeze placed on teachers, administrators and support staff last year, she said.

"I want to reiterate what a great job our administrators, teachers and support staff did, since a big chunk of that money came from the spending freeze and not buying supplies, which made a huge difference in our budget this year," Miller said. "We're still in a pretty precarious position financially, but we're thrilled to have that little bit of a cushion."

Miller said the cuts were completed mainly through staff reductions and retirements, which accounted for 98 percent of the $3-million.

"The result is, the district will have 29 fewer teachers, 12 fewer support staff and nine-and-a-half fewer administrative staff than we started out with in the 2009-2010 school year," Miller said.

She said closing Graham Road Elementary School was a big part of the budget adjustments. Even with the passage of a May operating levy, $3-million in cuts were needed in order to make the levy money last until 2014, she said.

"We're in the process of reinstating the things we promised with the levy passing: Reinstating busing and phasing in art, music and physical education," Miller said.