As Michelle Kazlausky's family and friends prepare for her funeral on Saturday, contributions in her name continue to be posted to a website she set up prior to her Pelotonia ride.

As Michelle Kazlausky's family and friends prepare for her funeral on Saturday, contributions in her name continue to be posted to a website she set up prior to her Pelotonia ride.

As of Tuesday, those pledges to be used for cancer research amounted to more than $18,000.

Plans for the funeral include an invitation to cyclists to meet at St. Pius X Catholic Church, 1051 S. Waggoner Road, Reynoldsburg, following the 10 a.m. service and cycle to Holy Cross Cemetery on National Road, where she will be interred.

Kazlausky known as Shelli was struck and killed Aug. 21 during the Columbus-to-Athens leg of the Pelotonia Tour. The 57-year-old medical technician was cycling east on state Route 374 through Hocking County when a pickup-truck driver failed to heed the directions from a State Highway Patrol trooper who was directing traffic at the intersection with state Route 180.

Ervin Blackston, 57, of Rockbridge, swerved but struck Kazlausky, who also tried to avoid a collision. She was pronounced dead at Hocking Valley Community Hospital.

A news release from the patrol said a preliminary investigation found that Blackston's brakes might have malfunctioned.

As Pelotonia riders returning from Athens on Aug. 22 crossed the finish line at Slate Run Metro Park in Pickaway County, their satisfaction at completing the 180-mile ride was mixed with heartache.

"It could have been any of us," Brian Biernat said, his eyes welling with tears.

Riders prayed for Kazlausky and her family as they cycled on Sunday. They rode more cautiously. They checked intersections carefully.

"You got to an intersection, instead of looking two or three times, you looked five times, " said Biernat, a skin-cancer surgeon from Grandview Heights. "You could tell (by) how people were riding, it was on everyone's mind."

Joe Lanotte, a Sprint salesman from Reynoldsburg, said he thought of Kazlausky as he pedaled through the intersection of routes 374 and 180. He said he was frustrated, too, about drivers "being stupid."

One passed cyclists pedaling uphill in a no-passing zone, then sped back into the correct lane and almost knocked a couple of riders off the road, Lanotte said.

Matt Dowds, an insurance agent from Columbus, prayed as he pedaled.

He prayed, as he always does when riding his bicycle on a Sunday, for the loved ones he has lost to cancer. He added prayers for Kazlausky and her family, and for the man whose pickup truck hit her.

Kazlausky's family she was one of five sisters and had three sons was moved by the tributes, her brother-in-law Jack Koelbl said.

Ohio State University President E. Gordon Gee was among those offering condolences. He issued a statement calling Kazlausky "deeply caring, compassionate and dedicated."

"Through her work in a clinical laboratory at University Hospital East and at the Comprehensive Cancer Center, she devoted her career to improving the lives of patients, " Gee said. "Through her participation in Pelotonia, she demonstrated her selfless commitment to discovering a cure for cancer."

Kazlausky was preceded in death by her parents, Frank and Florence Richert, and son Gregory McMahon. She is survived by sons Jeffrey McMahon and Caleb Kazlausky; brother Bill Richert; sisters Barbara (Jack) Koebl, Becky (Bob) Brown, twin sister Patti (Neal) Byerly, Megan (Bart) McBane and Beth (Paul) Money.

The family will receive friends from 5-8 p.m. Friday at Cotner Funeral Home, 7369 E. Main St., Reynoldsburg.