Data collected as part of a Battelle for Kids project designed to improve teacher effectiveness and student achievement show Reynoldsburg High School science teacher Jessica Cully produces highly effective results.

Data collected as part of a Battelle for Kids project designed to improve teacher effectiveness and student achievement show Reynoldsburg High School science teacher Jessica Cully produces highly effective results.

Battelle for Kids started the Teachers Connecting Achievement and Progress (TCAP) project in 2006 to bring value-added analysis to the classroom.

"Kids are measured each year and you measure them one year to see how far they've come since the last," Reynoldsburg district spokesperson Tricia Moore said. "The growth demonstrated by kids in Jessica's classes is phenomenal.

"The value-added data is very important in this district. It's how we know whether our students are gaining the knowledge that we want them to gain during the course of the year," she said.

RHS assistant principal Denise Lutz said Cully was able to obtain more than one year's growth from her students, according to a review of information collected last year. Her students tested at a very high college-ready level.

The Reynoldsburg Board of Education presented Cully with a certificate of recognition at its meeting last week.

Superintendent Steve Dackin said Cully's results represent the top 2 percent of all the teachers in Ohio who participated in the project.

Tim Kelso, marketing coordinator at Battelle for Kids, said Monday, March 21, that the project included 145 Ohio teachers.

"It's quite the accomplishment to be recognized at that level with that kind of confidence," he said. "The folks who benefit directly are her kids," Dackin said.

"The commitment Jessica has is to share those practices with teachers across the state and in our own school district, so we're very fortunate and grateful to have her as a teacher in the Reynoldsburg city schools."

A resident of Dublin, Cully graduated from Bowling Green State University in 2003 with a degree in life sciences education. She has been teaching science at RHS for the past five years.

Receiving the Battelle for Kids award and recognition from the board of education is "an honor but not necessary at all, because I'm just doing my job," Cully said.

"I just try to let my students know how important it is to get an education and to appreciate knowledge and be a lifelong learner," she said. "They don't have to love it, but just to appreciate it."

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Jessica Cully