Reynoldsburg's mayor will continue to appoint department directors without the consent of City Council after proposed changes to the city charter failed to get enough backing from council members.

Reynoldsburg's mayor will continue to appoint department directors without the consent of City Council after proposed changes to the city charter failed to get enough backing from council members.

But voters likely will get to consider other charter amendments, including one that would no longer mandate a primary election to be held if there are no contested races; another that would allow the city attorney to serve as legal counsel for the school district; and a third that says the city development director would not be permitted to cast votes as a member of the Reynoldsburg Planning Commission or the Board of Zoning and Appeals.

Council must decide whether to place the proposed changes on the November ballot.

Council appointed Republicans Lane Beougher and Robert Cook, Democrats Roxyanne C. Burrus and Michele Ray and Independent Richard Donovan to serve on a charter review committee that met five times between May 10 and June 7.

The charter is reviewed every five years.

"The mayor is elected by the residents and I see no reason why he can't have who he wants in his administration," Councilman Mel Clemens said. "If it doesn't work out, we do have the authority to de-fund the position."

Beougher, who led the charter review committee, said the intent was to "harmonize" the three positions, which include the directors of safety, service and parks and recreation.

"How do you make sure everybody's in agreement on the right people for the right job?" he said. "It is a separation-of-powers issue. The interesting thing is, the parks and recreation director already had the council approval in the original charter. We were just trying to make them consistent."

Also, a 2009 Ohio Supreme Court ruling invalidates charter provisions that require employees to reside in the city of their employment, Beougher said.

Councilman Nathan Burd, citing costs, questioned the need for an uncontested primary. In a memo to City Council and others, he said Reynoldsburg is the only community in Franklin County that conducts primary elections for uncontested races.

"All things considered, it costs roughly $1,700 per precinct to run an election," he said in the memo. "For a city with 20 precincts, it can be quite a financial burden to hold meaningless primary elections."

Since the city's development director is responsible for promoting development, the charter review committee thought it was a conflict of interest to allow the director to cast votes on both the Planning Commission and the Board of Zoning Appeals.

The last charter review commission recommended Reynoldsburg become a nonpartisan city where those seeking elected office would not run based on any party affiliation. That recommendation was not supported by council and did not move forward to the ballot.