Reynoldsburg City Council unanimously approved funding on Monday, July 23, for a $1.1-million project to repair Lancaster Avenue.

Reynoldsburg City Council unanimously approved funding on Monday, July 23, for a $1.1-million project to repair Lancaster Avenue.

The money will come from the city's permissive tax and street and stormwater funds.

"This is the only road project this year and it might be the only one you see for two years," Service Director William Smith said. "We're going to mill the surface of the entire street down more than two inches and replace that with new asphalt."

Lancaster Avenue runs from the northern boundary of the city to Main Street. Smith wasn't certain when the work would begin.

A majority of the Lancaster Avenue funding, $1,072,319, will come from Franklin County's permissive tax fund. Repairs to the storm water system will cost $63,486, Smith said.

Counties have the authority to enact up to $15 in motor vehicle license taxes in three separate increments of $5 each. These taxes are levied on top of the uniform statewide fee of $34.50.

Municipalities and townships have various authorities to levy their own permissive taxes.

Mayor Brad McCloud indicated earlier this year that street improvements would be at a minimum in 2012 because of limited funding. Councilman Mel Clemens has said Reynoldsburg's street program has fallen behind by upward of $10 million in the past few years.

Other infrastructure projects planned for this year include work to replace a Huber subdivision water line that was installed more than 50 years ago. It's expected to be completed before the October deadline.

Crews will slip-line aging sewer lines and rehabilitate manholes in an area northeast of Rosehill Road and East Livingston Avenue next month.

In the last session before its summer recess, council also voted July 23 to send four city charter amendments to the November ballot.

One would remove the current city mandate that requires a primary election to be held even if there are no contested races; another, if approved, would allow the city attorney to serve as legal counsel for the school district; and two others would prohibit the city development director from casting votes as a member of the Reynoldsburg Planning Commission or the Board of Zoning and Appeals.

The charter is reviewed every five years.