The last time a five-member panel examined the boundaries of Reynoldsburg City Council's four wards, the forecast was that the population would continue to move east.

The last time a five-member panel examined the boundaries of Reynoldsburg City Council's four wards, the forecast was that the population would continue to move east.

Ten years later, that prediction holds true as members of the Ward Boundary Commission look to shift council ward borders based on information from the U.S. Census Bureau and the firm Evans, Mechwart, Hambleton & Tilton of New Albany.

The city charter requires the process every 10 years.

"What we're looking for is balance," commission Chairman Preston Stearns said. "When it comes to population, we're trying to keep each ward the same as much as possible. We're going to be looking at shifting some streets with Wards 2 and 3 growing."

Stearns, Vice Chairman Bruce Sowell and members Robert Cook, Ryan Brzezinski and Marshall Spalding were to consider two possible scenarios during the commission's Aug. 21 meeting, after ThisWeek's press time.

Data compiled by E.M.H.&T's Derek Mair showed Wards 3 (11,519 residents) and 2 (9,267) have the largest populations, while Wards 4 (7,642) and 1 (7,447) have lost citizens.

There were 35,875 residents counted during the 2010 census.

When the ward boundaries were redrawn in 2002, Wards 1 and 4 were expanded to the east, ThisWeek reported at the time. North of Lancaster Avenue, in the older section of Reynoldsburg , a development previously in Ward 2 was changed to Ward 1.

Councilman Scott Barrett represents Ward 1 and Mel Clemens was elected to serve Ward 4 residents. Leslie Kelly and Cornelius McGrady serve Wards 2 and 3, respectively.

Barth Cotner, Chris Long and Nathan Burd are council's at-large members.

"There were no surprises in the data," Stearns said. "With today's technology, it shouldn't take long to redraw the map. We had an idea that Wards 1 and 4 had lost population."

Any ward boundary reviews and recommendations should be submitted and in place before the next ward elections, scheduled for November 2015.

No more than two members of the commission, which met for the first time July 23, can represent one political party. Each ward of the city is represented by one person on the panel.