Items placed in a time capsule recovered from the former Burkhardt Center at First Community Village, 1800 Riverside Drive, give a glimpse of life in central Ohio in the 1960s and '70s.

Items placed in a time capsule recovered from the former Burkhardt Center at First Community Village, 1800 Riverside Drive, give a glimpse of life in central Ohio in the 1960s and '70s.

On April 17, representatives of First Community Village and the Upper Arlington Historical Society opened a time capsule that was placed in the Burkhardt Center's cornerstone when the building was constructed in 1962. The capsule was recovered last year during FCV's extensive renovation, when the Burkhardt Center was demolished to make way for the new Chelsea Building.

Although FCV administrators were aware of the capsule, it was not accessible until the demolition because a column had been placed over the cornerstone when the Burkhardt Center was renovated in 1993.

"The building had to be torn down to get to it," said FCV president John Sandman. "The column was right where the cornerstone was."

The capsule was originally placed during the Burkhardt Center's cornerstone-laying ceremony on Oct. 7, 1962. Items were subsequently added over the years.

Items included black-and-white photos documenting important FCV events, including former resident Metta Karn receiving the Villager of the Year Award on Feb. 4, 1973; a newsreel from local station WTVN-TV from Sept. 9, 1962; a 1962 coin commemorating Columbus' sesquicentennial; and a front page from the Columbus Sunday Dispatch from May 13, 1973, with the headline "Astronauts Prepared for Adventure in Space," chronicling the first U.S. trip to the Skylab space station.

The capsule also contained a letter from renowned developer and Upper Arlington resident, the late John W. Galbreath, which he composed for the Burkhardt Center cornerstone-laying ceremony on Oct. 7, 1962. In the letter, Galbreath speculated what life in central Ohio would be like in 2012, when the capsule was originally supposed to be opened.

"At the moment, our city is in a very formative era of planning for the future," Galbreath wrote. "If we can avoid selfish and personal aims, using all the wonderful talent we have in steering the plans for the future, no city will have more to offer its people than Columbus, Ohio, U.S.A."

In his projections for central Ohio in the 21st century, Galbreath added, "I predict that we will solve all the problems of growth which we are now encountering to the end that, once the pattern is set, we will witness a growth percentagewise second to none in our country."

The time capsule items represent invaluable pieces of history, said Jackie Cherry, historian for First Community Church, which established FCV.

"All this is very exciting to me because I'm chairing the centennial celebration of First Community Church, which will be held next year," Cherry said. "We're going to be opening our cornerstones."

FCV and historical society representatives said they are still deciding how to archive the FCV time capsule items and place them on public display.

cbournea@thisweeknews.com