Proposed improvements to Henderson Road met with little enthusiasm from residents at a Sept. 25 public forum at First Alliance Church, 3750 W. Henderson Road.

Proposed improvements to Henderson Road met with little enthusiasm from residents at a Sept. 25 public forum at First Alliance Church, 3750 W. Henderson Road.

The forum was a follow-up to an initial public meeting held in January to gather public feedback on what amenities should be included in the city of Upper Arlington's plans to reconstruct Henderson Road from Riverside Drive on the west to Sawmill Road on the east.

"We took your comments from the first public meeting and distilled them down into two options," Jeff Barnhart, a city engineering technician, told about 20 residents in attendance.

Both scenarios for Henderson Road improvements include pavement reconstruction, curbs for drainage and traffic calming, additional lighting, and an 8-foot-wide multi-use path along the north side of the road.

The first scenario includes a mini-roundabout to calm traffic at the intersection of Hampton and Tarrington lanes. The multi-use path would meander to avoid larger trees.

In the second scenario, a slightly elevated platform would be installed to calm traffic at the Hampton-Tarrington intersection. The multi-use path would remain close to Henderson road and a sidewalk would be installed on the south side of the road from Hampton to Sawmill Road.

Residents expressed concerns that the multi-use path and sidewalk would be a waste of taxpayer dollars, since Henderson Road is too busy for pedestrian and bicycle traffic.

"Nobody walks on this road now. What's the need?" said Henderson Road resident Michael Streicher.

He added that he's concerned that trees that screen homes from traffic on the heavily-traveled thoroughfare will be lost if the multi-use path were installed.

"My fear is the city will ignore the homeowners and the impact it will have on them," Streicher said.

Pat Hall, who also lives on Henderson Road, said she believes the city ignored the concerns of residents that the Central Ohio Medical Building, which was built in 2007 on a 2.57-acre plot at 4026/4030 W. Henderson Road, would increase traffic in the area.

"If our road is really falling apart, they should replace it and not abuse the taxpayers on Henderson Road anymore than we already have been," Hall said.

Based on public input from the Sept. 25 meeting, city engineers will meet with engineering firm Burgess & Niple to modify plans and narrow down the two scenarios to one, with a presentation to be made to council this fall, Barnhart said.

Council will not vote on a finalized plan until fall 2009, when cost estimates for the project will be determined and factored into the city's 2010 capital improvement budget.