The roundabout that was installed four years ago at the intersection of Arlington Avenue and Tremont and Stanford roads near Miller Park may not become permanent until 2010.

The roundabout that was installed four years ago at the intersection of Arlington Avenue and Tremont and Stanford roads near Miller Park may not become permanent until 2010.

Upper Arlington City Council initially allotted $15,000 in fall 2004 to install a temporary roundabout to see whether it improved traffic flow at the heavily-traveled intersection.

The city's Public Services Department is negotiating with Columbus-based engineering firm E.P. Ferris & Associates to design a permanent roundabout. The department will determine the scope of the project before submitting a contract for council approval, said city engineer Tom Komlanc.

"We are in scope review with E.P. Ferris," Komlanc said. "Once we finalize the scope, we'll be able to negotiate fees."

Construction of the permanent roundabout will likely be included in roadway and storm sewer work along Arlington Avenue in 2010, Komlanc said.

"It was not part of the 2009 budget. If we get additional funds from the CIP (capital improvement program), we'll be able to proceed," Komlanc said. "If not, we'd have to ask council for additional funds."

The Public Services Department will also apply for grants for the Ohio Public Works Commission to fund the installation of the permanent roundabout.

"We're looking at additional funds," Komlanc said.

Roundabouts are designed to improve traffic flow, Komlanc said.

"Generally, they tend to work well once the motoring public gets acclimated to them," he said.

All roundabout traffic is one-way, counterclockwise. Because roundabouts simplify the decision-making process for drivers and cause them to slow down, roundabouts can reduce accidents by as much as 75 percent, Public Services Department research indicates.

Roundabouts direct traffic in such a way that head-on collisions are avoided, Komlanc said.

"If somebody was turning left, you more or less would get sideswiped if an accident were to happen," he said.

Meetings to be held as part of the Arlington Avenue roadway and storm sewer improvements will give residents an opportunity to comment on the roundabout, Komlanc said.

cbournea@thisweeknews.com