The city of Upper Arlington is moving forward with plans to rebuild Henderson Road. City engineer Tom Komlanc and representatives of engineering firm Burgess & Niple presented plans at Upper Arlington City Council's Feb. 17 conference session.

The city of Upper Arlington is moving forward with plans to rebuild Henderson Road. City engineer Tom Komlanc and representatives of engineering firm Burgess & Niple presented plans at Upper Arlington City Council's Feb. 17 conference session.

The project would repave Henderson Road from Riverside Drive to Sawmill Road. Currently, about 11,000 vehicles a day travel the two-lane, 35-mph road, with an average speed of 42 mph, according to a study conducted by Burgess & Niple.

The goals of the rebuilding project include replacing deteriorating pavement, improving roadway safety and reducing vehicular speeds. The plan also calls for the city to consider placing a sidewalk or multi-use path on the north side of the road, in keeping with the city's policy to consider installing sidewalks on at least one side of the street in major road projects.

A multi-use path could be included in the Columbus Bicycle Master Plan, which calls for bike paths to eventually extend to the Henderson/Sawmill Road area.

"If we're forward-thinking, in 10, 15 years, it will connect," said Steve Thieken, Burgess & Niple project manager.

The Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission estimates 1.3 percent growth per year in traffic volume on Henderson Road through 2030. The current version of Upper Arlington's rebuilding plan calls for the installation of a roundabout as a traffic-calming measure.

"It would be designed in such a way that trucks and buses can get through there," Thieken said of the roundabout.

Komlanc said he is awaiting word from the city of Columbus to find out if a crosswalk can be installed to improve pedestrian safety at the intersection of Henderson and Sawmill.

Estimated construction cost for the Henderson Road project is $1-million. The city could recover some of the cost through tax-increment financing, said finance director Cathe Armstrong.

"Even though we could recoup the money through the TIF, that's long term," she said. "Initially that money would have to come out of the city's coffers."

At two public forums last year, residents indicated a preference for minimal changes to Henderson Road so as not to impact property lines.

Council will not vote on a finalized plan until fall, when cost estimates for the project will be determined and factored into the city's 2010 capital improvement budget.

cbournea@thisweeknews.com