The city of Upper Arlington Concourse Gallery will present "Destination Lyle," an exhibition of works on view through a partnership with the Lyle Gallery, Jan. 6-25 at the Municipal Services Center, 3600 Tremont Road.

The city of Upper Arlington Concourse Gallery will present "Destination Lyle," an exhibition of works on view through a partnership with the Lyle Gallery, Jan. 6-25 at the Municipal Services Center, 3600 Tremont Road.

The exhibition is free and open to the public Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

An opening reception is scheduled on Monday Jan. 11, from 5 to 7 p.m.

The exhibition features contemporary plein air painter Karen LaValley, watercolorist David Schackne, and historical painters Emerson Burkhart and Ralph Fanning.

The Lyle Gallery, located in the Discovery District, opened in 2007. It features the best in contemporary central Ohio painters and historical works.

LaValley, who holds a bachelor's degree in fine arts from Ohio State University, is a signature member of the Ohio Watercolor Society and a charter member of the Ohio Plein Air Society. She continues to win numerous awards in Ohio and throughout the United States.

Schackne, a practicing architect since 1951, has returned to one of his first loves: watercolors. He was born in Pittsburgh, graduated from Grandview High School in Columbus and served in World War II. After attending Columbus College of Art and Design as a teenager, he studied fine arts at Ohio State University and later graduated in architecture. His style of painting is primarily linear fauvism.

Ohio-born Emerson Burkhart graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University in 1927 and studied at the Art Student's League in New York City. He was an early member of the Ohio Art League. Burkhart was primarily an American Scene painter, although he painted in impressionist, post-impressionist and realist styles at different points in his career. He died in November 1969 at his home in Columbus.

Ralph Fanning taught the history of European and American art for 37 years at Ohio State, developing his own style of teaching which included as many as 95 slides of work during a 45-minute lecture. As an artist his work always displayed his love of architecture and travel.