After a flurry of bank robberies in Upper Arlington and the Columbus area since December, the authorities are starting to catch up with arrests and indictments.

After a flurry of bank robberies in Upper Arlington and the Columbus area since December, the authorities are starting to catch up with arrests and indictments.

Dennis Grigsby, 43, was indicted April 22 on three counts of unarmed bank robbery, including the Fifth Third bank on Henderson Road March 31. Grigsby was dubbed the "Mothership Bandit" by the FBI "because of the outlandish attire worn by the robber in the first couple of bank robberies resembling someone from the 1970s funk band Parliament," according to an FBI statement.

In the indictment, Grigsby is charged with taking approximately $2,700 at Fifth Third, with an additional approximately $4,800 from two Columbus banks, one in the Grandview area. Grigsby is also suspected in two Indianapolis bank robberies.

In addition to the Mothership Bandit, Upper Arlington banks have been victimized by the "Suburban Bank Robber," who robbed the Farmers Citizens Bank, 2821 Fishinger Road, and is a suspect in robberies in Reynoldsburg and Worthington also, and the "Sharp Dressed Man," who struck the same Fifth Third bank on Henderson as Grigsby is charged with robbing.

The Suburban Bank Robber is described as a white male, approximately 20s-30s of age, 5'10", medium build, unshaven, wearing a dark hooded jacket, aviator-type sunglasses, blue jeans, dark shoes, and dark gloves. The Sharp Dressed Man is a black male, apparently in his 50s and about 6 foot 2 inches tall with a thin build.

The FBI released its national bank robbery statistics two weeks ago, noting that nationwide there were 5,943 bank robberies in 2009, a significant decrease from 2008, when nearly 7,000 incidents were reported.

"He was arrested when he went to turn in a rental car," FBI Special Agent Harry Trombitas said of Grigsby. "He's incarcerated in the Hamilton County Jail on a charge of resisting arrest. We anticipate over the next few days he'll have a hearing and at that point be kicked over to our responsibility."

Trombitas said he expected Grigsby to be prosecuted in a federal court in Columbus on both the Ohio and Indianapolis charges.

"That's one of the advantages of the federal system," Trombitas said. "Rather than prosecuting him in Franklin County and then trying him in Indiana, he can be tried in Columbus under a single system."