Long before the Upper Arlington Community Foundation decided to raise the Amelita Mirolo Barn at Sunny 95 Park, the old wooden building served as part of a working farm on Fishinger Road.

Long before the Upper Arlington Community Foundation decided to raise the Amelita Mirolo Barn at Sunny 95 Park, the old wooden building served as part of a working farm on Fishinger Road.

The barn, constructed in the mid-1800s near the current intersection of Fishinger and Redding roads, originally belonged to the Legg family's 200-acre farm.

Lewis Thomas Legg, who was the first of the Legg family to be born in Upper Arlington, built the barn.

His great-great granddaughters, twin sisters Helen Legg Detrick and Ruth Legg Krabach, 65, and their older sister Mitzi Krebs, 68, grew up in Upper Arlington on Camden Road having no idea that the family's historic barn still sat in their community.

The three sisters, who have since moved from Upper Arlington, were shocked when they got a call last month from Kate Erstein, executive director of the Upper Arlington Historical Society.

"We didn't realize the barn existed," Krabach said. "I am very happy to be a part of the process."

The woman plan to be a big part of the project. The sisters have made a gift of $30,000 to the community foundation to help with the creation of the new community center, which is expect to cost about $900,000.

The Leggs have had a chance to see the beams of the barn, which currently are in storage until the barn-raising event scheduled for Sunday, Sept. 26.

Detrick said it was like touching a piece of her family.

"It was wonderful," she said. "You wish you had that sixth sense."

Though the Legg land now is home to a group of single-family homes and the Wellington School, a small cemetery sits north of the school as a reminder of the large family farm.

The barn, though, had a transient history in the city.

In the early 1920s, the barn was moved to 1988 Lane Road, near the intersection of Lane and Reed roads.

When much of the original barn burned to the ground in the 1920s, P.J. McCoy, for whom McCoy Road is named, either bought or was given the Legg barn and rebuilt it on his property after his own burned to the ground.

His granddaughter, Anna Marie Davidson Drake, was born and died in the same bed at her childhood home on Lane Road. Her home was built in 1894.

When she died a few years ago, her belongings, the land and the house were sold at auction. The historical society decided to preserve the barn for future use at that time.

Erstein said the barn on the McCoy/Drake property was the last working barn in Upper Arlington.

"It's the root of the community," she said. "The first focus of the community was farming."

She said she has spoken to people who remember going to the barn on Lane Road as children to buy eggs.

"In the early 1970s, the city came and said, 'We can't have a farm here anymore. It's a city now,'" Erstein said. "They had to stop farming then."

Erstein said the Amelita Mirolo Barn will represent the blending of Upper Arlington's future with its past.

"It really reminds us of the roots of the community," she said. "(Upper Arlington) wasn't always a housing development; it was a farm."

Linda Readey, executive director of the community foundation, said the barn will give the community a sense of where it has been.

"I think it's always important to know about your past and to know something has made it this long," she said. "You don't think of Fishinger Road having anything agricultural on it now, but it did in a not so far distant past."

She said the families that have history with the barn should be proud.

"I would certainly be very proud that because my family on both sides had farms in the history of the family, to think that something had been saved and retained would give me a great sense of pride," Readey said. "I hope they feel the same."