Plowing the streets of Upper Arlington after the first major snowfall on Dec. 12 "went real well," according to public service manager Buddy Caplinger.

Plowing the streets of Upper Arlington after the first major snowfall on Dec. 12 "went real well," according to public service manager Buddy Caplinger.

"We started Sunday around 9:30 a.m., and then ran until 5:30 p.m. and then we let those guys go for the day," Caplinger said. They finished around 3:30 p.m. the next day, clearing all the streets after they were covered again overnight.

"We're from 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. every day, that's regular," Caplinger said. "But with snow, we go into shifts and rotate the guys as we go in and out as we go, depending on the length of the storm."

Caplinger said just 7 of the city's 17 plows were used because the storm wasn't severe.

"We try to be fiscally as fit as we can with the use of equipment and men that we get out there per storm," Caplinger said. Overtime is paid as necessary.

The first snow struck just after the public services department had completed leaf collection for the season. The city's policy says plowing begins after 3 inches of snowfall.

About 200 tons of salt were used, which Caplinger said is average for that type of storm. Prior to the storm, the salt barn was completely full with 1,700 tons of salt. Caplinger said the city usually goes through 3,000 tons in a year.

Last winter saw "an exorbitant amount of snow," Caplinger said. "We'll have to make adjustments if we have that type of winter again. Hopefully we won't have to use that much salt, and we do pre-treat our roads with brine to help with not using as much salt."

During last February's record snowfall, 85 percent of respondents to an online survey said local road crews did "an exceptional job" of snow removal.

"Our policy is once the snow event starts, depending on the type of snow, to get the roads cleared within eight hours," Caplinger said. All of the city's 205 lane miles get cleared, with the main (arterial) streets (such as Arlington Avenue and Zollinger Road), getting the top priority. Next are the secondary (collector) streets (such as Andover Road and Windham Road). Lastly, residential streets are cleared.

If the snow continues, they go through the cycle again.

Caplinger said one of the problems with plowing is that a lot of people park on the street.

"They do have to dig out when we have a big snow along the street to get out with their vehicles," he said. "Also one of the things that we see a lot here is that we have a lot of runners at 2 or 3 a.m. (They're) out on the roads while it's snowing and we're plowing."

Although Caplinger understands that the runners and bicyclists would rather tread where tires have gone over the snow, he said they should use the sidewalk for their safety.