You probably wouldn't take a second look at the ranch-style home with the well-manicured lawn at 1415 Kirkley Road in Upper Arlington.

You probably wouldn't take a second look at the ranch-style home with the well-manicured lawn at 1415 Kirkley Road in Upper Arlington.

But it could join the ranks of homes of famous people such as Thomas Alva Edison and Ulysses S. Grant on the National Register of Historic Places.

The three-bedroom home, made of stucco, brick and aluminum and built in 1958, was nominated by the state April 13 for the national register, which contains some of America's most-famous landmark addresses, including 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. (the White House).

Why is it so special?

In part, it's a "typical ranch-style house" of the type that swept the nation in the 1950s after World War II, when returning veterans and their families sought larger, more-comfortable homes in the suburbs.

But the nomination is also tied to the fact that it was home to Frederick G. Kilgour, an educator, librarian, historian and entrepreneur who founded the Online Computer Library Center, an automated system that now links 72,000 institutions in 171 countries.

Kilgour, who was educated at Harvard and worked at Yale before moving to the Columbus area in 1967, bought the house in part because of its proximity to Ohio State University, where he worked. He and his wife, Eleanor, lived there until they moved to North Carolina in 1990. Kilgour died in 2006.

The Ohio Historic Site Preservation Board initially considered nominating the property in 2010, but it postponed action to check out links to properties related to OCLC. The board formalized the nomination at a meeting Feb. 13.

To qualify for the national register, a property must be associated with "events that have made a significant contribution to the broad patterns of our history, or with the lives of people significant in our past."

A nomination neither obligates owners to repair or improve a property, nor prevents them from remodeling or altering it.

However, owners can qualify for a 20-percent federal income-tax credit for approved repair and preservation work.