Upper Arlington-Kids Identified with Dyslexia (UA-KID) kicked off a new collaboration last week with the Upper Arlington Public Library to establish a section at the library's Tremont Road branch, 2800 Tremont Road, to provide reading resources to children struggling with dyslexia.

Upper Arlington-Kids Identified with Dyslexia (UA-KID) kicked off a new collaboration last week with the Upper Arlington Public Library to establish a section at the library's Tremont Road branch, 2800 Tremont Road, to provide reading resources to children struggling with dyslexia.

The section, which will offer books and other materials donated by UA-KID, also will include resources for parents to help identify if their children might have dyslexia, and resources about techniques for addressing it.

"The library is a scary place for kids with dyslexia," said Brett Tingley, a UA-KID member. "We are donating new and used books that are appropriate for parents and children with dyslexia so the library can better serve them.

"We are trying to educate and spread awareness in the community."

Library Director Chris Taylor said the Tremont branch hopes to unveil its special section for children and parents dealing with dyslexia by the end of this year.

In addition to the materials donated by UA-KID, Taylor said, the group has recommended numerous authors and publishers of books and materials specifically designed to serve those dealing with dyslexia.

"We're very interested in providing materials to help Upper Arlington schools and all UA residents," Taylor said. "(UA-KID) really helped us know who are the authors in this area and where to go to get materials in this area.

"It's a specialized population that has some special needs. The partnership with UA-KID is great because it can help us find those resources and learn what dyslexia is all about."

UA-KID was formed by Upper Arlington parents of children with dyslexia about two years ago because of concerns that their children's learning needs weren't being adequately addressed by Upper Arlington schools.

A group Tingley described as a "small subset" of UA-KID members took their issues to the Ohio Department of Education, which in August 2011 found the district wasn't doing enough to identify, locate and evaluate students with dyslexia.

Tingley and fellow UA-KID member Debbie Segor said they've seen marked improvement in the school district's willingness to address issues of dyslexia since current Superintendent Paul Imhoff was hired.

Imhoff also is part of the partnership with UA-KID and the library.

"There are many high schoolers who've passed through the system and don't read well, but at any age, parents can step in," Segor said. "We want to be a continuing resource to parents.

"We've made such great strides in the last couple years, but there's just so far to go."

Segor noted dyslexia isn't related to a lack of intelligence. Rather, she said, children with dyslexia have average to above-average intelligence, but they learn to read differently.

The books UA-KID has donated to the library are rich in phonics and multisensory learning, Segor said.

"It's not an intelligence thing," she said. "If you remediate early, the brain can be rewired."

Additional information about the new partnership between the library and UA-KID can be found at ualibrary.org. Information about UA-KID is available at ua-kid.com.