Upper Arlington News

Student artists find expression in clay, paper, film

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Upper Arlington High School students whose work will be included in the annual Ohio Governor's Youth Art Exhibition said they were excited to be selected.

Sean Garrett, who plans to attend the Rhode Island School of Design, said his Morning Call was an attempt to create "something new."

"This piece showed me a new perspective on ceramic creativity and since then, I have been going back to the beginning on what really makes something art -- working with the most primitive of techniques, including pit fire, hand-building and most importantly, working with what the clay tells me to do," he said.

"This has led me down a path toward asymmetrical nonfunctional ceramic sculptures and away from my traditional ceramic functional ware," he said.

Shea Stiebler made Direction Dress 2 entirely of paper maps.

"My goal was to capture the intricate details in paper-folding techniques and combine them with high-fashion trends to create wearable art," she said.

"My inspiration came from an art theme of travel combined with my interest in fashion.

"When thinking of travel, maps automatically popped into my head and instantly, I wanted to make a dress," she said. "I took time researching origami and paper techniques and combined them with my knowledge in pattern-making to create the design for the dress."

Liam Campbell said his video, Common Ground, was written with Perry Finley.

"It's about a street performer who plays guitar for money and a middle-class man who is losing connection with his teenage daughter," he said. "The main themes in the film are greed, poverty and social class."

The film can be viewed online at vimeo.com/82803379.

Campbell and Finley took a college-level class at the University of Southern California School of Cinematic Arts last summer to learn more about film.

"We spent a long time developing the concept, accepting ideas, throwing out others and ended up with the idea for Common Ground," Campbell said. "It is a very long process, developing a story, and we really wanted to focus on everyday occurrences and realistic events and not make the story too complex."

They shot the film in the Short North in Columbus.

"While we were shooting the film in subzero temperatures, we were approached by several homeless people," Campbell said. "One suggested that we make a documentary on what it is really like to be homeless. It is everyday experiences like this that could be inspiring our next story."

Cole Hendrix said his video is "an experimental spill paint video."

"Spill painting is pouring paint onto a box or object so that it spills down the side of it and creates a multicolored painting," he said. "I filmed this from a bunch of different angles and with a lot of different colors. Applying kaleidoscope effects as well as mirror imaging the footage gave it a very surreal feeling."

The music he used was That's All for Everyone by Tame Impala.

"My inspiration sparked from my need to be formalistic and express myself through film," he said. "Too many movies today are realistic. I want the world to be filled with films like Stanley Kubrick's masterpiece, 2001: A Space Odyssey and Ray Enright's film Dames."

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