Upper Arlington News

Man convicted on porn charge to move

By

An Upper Arlington attorney convicted this year on a child pornography charge will likely drop his fight against the city and move away from a local school, his lawyer said last week.

William Feldman, a former Ohio Department of Taxation attorney who was convicted last January of pandering sexually-oriented matter involving a minor, is not likely to challenge Upper Arlington and Franklin County prosecutors who say he must move from his Lyon Drive home.

"He's relocating," said Eric J. Hoffman, a Columbus attorney representing Feldman. "It's not going to be a problem."

Feldman is scheduled for an Aug. 1 hearing in Franklin County Common Pleas Court in which the Upper Arlington City Attorney's Office and the Franklin County Prosecutor's Office are set to ask for an injunction forcing him to move from his home, which is within 1,000 feet of Greensview Elementary School.

Franklin County Prosecutor Ron O'Brien and Upper Arlington City Attorney Jeanine Hummer filed a civil complaint March 7 seeking a court order for Feldman to permanently relocate from his home. Both state and city laws prohibit convicted sex offenders from living within 1,000 feet of a school, and Upper Arlington's laws also restrict them from residing within 1,000 feet of licensed daycare facilities, preschools, public parks, swimming pools, libraries or playgrounds.

However, Hoffman said July 3 he doesn't expect that Aug. 1 hearing will be necessary.

"We'll probably resolve this prior to the hearing," Hoffman said. "He's already purchased (another home) and he's rehabbing it."

Previously, Hoffman had indicated Feldman shouldn't have to relocate because he purchased his home before the local statute was enacted.

"He's probably not going to make that argument now," he said.

Feldman was sentenced Jan. 30 to three years' probation and ordered to register with the Franklin County Sheriff's Office as a Tier II sex offender after he pleaded guilty to a felony charge of pandering sexually oriented matter involving a minor.

According to Franklin County Chief Deputy Sheriff Rick Minerd, the Franklin County Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force -- which teams with local law enforcement officials -- searched Feldman's home in May 2012 after discovering he had accessed child pornography through a file-sharing website.

Feldman was indicted on eight felony counts of pandering but through a plea arrangement with prosecutors pleaded guilty to just one charge.

"I'm pleased to hear that (Feldman) will be coming into compliance with the statute," said Tom Lindsey, Upper Arlington first assistant attorney.

Also on July 3, the Ohio Supreme Court accepted Feldman's resignation from the practice of law.

The 66-year-old, who was a state tax lawyer from 1973 until his retirement in 2010, previously had his inactive law license suspended by the court.

Comments