A group of residents will seek to remove five of Upper Arlington City Council's seven current members through a recall vote.

A group of residents will seek to remove five of Upper Arlington City Council's seven current members through a recall vote.

An Upper Arlington resident and an official with the Franklin County Board of Elections confirmed Monday there is an effort underway to recall Upper Arlington City Council members.

According to Dan McCormick, an Upper Arlington resident who attended an impromptu meeting of concerned citizens Saturday, Aug. 29, said a group of citizens will seek to force a vote to remove John C. Adams, David DeCapua, Kip Greenhill, Debbie Johnson and Don Leach due to recent decisions related to fiscal management, the planned $14-million redevelopment of Northam Park and a November 2014 income tax initiative.

The news comes one week after council voted 6-1 in favor of moving forward with the design of most of the components of a $14 million rebuild of Northam Park.

The five members who are the focus of the recall effort each voted in support of moving forward with the park's design. Councilman Erik Yassenoff did, as well, but he will leave office at the end of this year due to city term limits that prevent council members from serving more than two consecutive, four-year terms.

Councilman Mike Schadek, who is not included in the recall movement, voted against proceeding with the city's plans for Northam Park, citing opposition in the community and his belief the city wasn't taking adequate time to plan the project and obtain public input.

McCormick said he isn't leading the recall initiative, but is concerned about issues discussed at the meeting.

"I'm certainly involved from the standpoint of neighbors helping neighbors," he said. "There were a lot of different constituencies and they had a lot of concerns."

Jeff Mackey, manager of the operations section of the Franklin County Board of Elections, said Monday that Upper Arlington residents would need to collect 1,989 signatures from registered Upper Arlington voters for each member of council they seek to recall.

If the signatures and ballot language are approved by the board of elections, an elected official subject to recall would then have five days to resign.

If the official does not resign, an election would be held within 30 to 40 days of the recall effort being approved, Mackey said.

"The election has to happen within 30 to 40 days of the petition being found valid," he said. "That would be quite a feat. We haven't had one of those around here for some time."

For more on this story, see the Sept. 3 edition of ThisWeek Upper Arlington News.