Music enthusiasts who formed a book club to foster interest in rock 'n' roll will record their monthly podcast next week at the Upper Arlington Public Library.

Music enthusiasts who formed a book club to foster interest in rock 'n' roll will record their monthly podcast next week at the Upper Arlington Public Library.

The Rock-n-Roll Book Club, "a collection of musicians and music fans," will do the first public taping of its monthly podcast in the Friends Theater of the Upper Arlington Public Library's Main Branch from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 26.

The club features Columbus radio veteran and wedding deejay Mark Dantzer and Pat Buzzard, guitarist and founding member of the Top 40 band Saving Jane. It also includes Chuck Johnson, an educator, entertainer and founding member of the Cooking Caravan, and Ryan Smith, a Columbus singer-songwriter and deejay.

Each month, the RRBC records a podcast in which it discusses rock star biographies and other books about music. The podcasts are available at rnrbookclub.com.

Next Tuesday's podcast will allow guests to sit in on a discussion about Hitless Wonder: A Life in Minor League Rock and Roll by Joe Oestreich, bassist and vocalist for the Columbus rock group Watershed. Oestreich now lives on the West Coast.

The event will feature a discussion with Oestreich via Skype and a live performance by Colin Gawel, vocalist and guitarist for Watershed.

"Upper Arlington Library is a bustling with energy and activity, and the Friends Theater is the perfect place for 75 or so music fans to kick back, get comfy and spend 90 minutes with fellow music fans," Dantzer said. "I have been in radio for 30 years (and) it is thrilling to get out of the studio and do a show face-to-face with the listeners.

"Hopefully, more folks will become aware of the library and RRBC."

Dantzer said RRBC was formed so he and his friends could share their passion for music without having to go to a bar until 1 a.m. on a Thursday night to see a band.

After the club concept was conceived, the group decided to share its discussions with the public.

"Initially, I just wanted to hang out with a few other guys and talk about music," he said. "Since we are all music pros, it was easy to record our book discussions and create a podcast.

"To our surprise and pleasure, there is a good-sized audience checking out our shows. We are eager to see if we can attract a national audience, a sponsor or two and most of all, demonstrate to other guys that this is a great way to hang out and form friendships -- something that can be a challenge to men."

While the RRBC is made up of four guys, Dantzer noted ladies, young and old, are invited to attend the podcast, which is expected to provide opportunities for guests to interact with Oestreich and RRBC members.

UAPL Community Engagement Specialist Jennifer Faure likewise encouraged people to come out, noting the RRBC is a "unique form of book club."

"The Upper Arlington Public Library has an obvious affinity for books, music and book discussion," Faure said.

Registration isn't required for the podcast, and the event is free to attend.

Faure said anyone who wants to read Hitless Wonder: A Life in Minor League Rock and Roll can reserve a copy through ualibrary.org or 614-486-9621.

"We've never offered a program that has blended all of these elements before and I'm excited to see how people respond to it," she said.