Burak Ergezen had to make a huge transition when he moved to the United States from Ankara, Turkey, in 2000 to pursue a graduate degree at Baldwin-Wallace College.

Burak Ergezen had to make a huge transition when he moved to the United States from Ankara, Turkey, in 2000 to pursue a graduate degree at Baldwin-Wallace College.

He had to get used to a new culture, a new language and a new lifestyle. One of the constants in his life, however, was soccer.

"It was a big adjustment, but I have to say playing soccer helped me a lot," said Ergezen, who has been named Wellington School girls soccer coach. "When I arrived here, I became a part of the Baldwin-Wallace soccer program and that helped me with the culture and the language here."

Ergezen, 34, is Wellington's fourth coach in three seasons. The Jaguars started last season under Billy Blake, who resigned midseason for personal reasons and was replaced by assistant coach Adam Ashbrook on an interim basis.

Last season, Wellington finished 6-9-1, losing to Ready 1-0 in the first round of the Division III district tournament. The Jaguars expect to return senior Neale Snyder (midfielder), juniors Annie Postle (defender), Gab Smith (goalkeeper) and Sarah Wakeman (forward) and sophomore Carolyn Faller (defender).

Athletics director Elizabeth Clapacs said Ergezen is a good fit for the program, which hasn't had a winning season since finishing 12-4-1 in 2008. The Jaguars finished 6-9-2 in 2009 and 8-9-1 in 2010.

"We're thrilled to have him join us at Wellington," she said. "While his qualifications are excellent, Burak brings a warm personality and contagious passion for soccer to our program."

While attending Baldwin-Wallace, which is in Berea in northeastern Ohio, Ergezen worked with both the men's and women's soccer teams as a student-coach. After graduating, he served as coach of the Rutgers University women's club team and then the junior varsity boys coach for Martinsville (N.J.) Pingry School.

The past two seasons, he was the boys varsity coach at Buckeye Valley.

Ergezen said his goal is to develop a program that emphasizes fundamentals, starting at the middle school level.

"I'll be really working with them on their technique," he said. "Their foot skills are going to be really important. From what I have observed so far during captains practice, they need to work on their ball skills. If we can hang on to the ball, I think we can get (positive) results.

"It's all about giving the players the right skills, technique and understanding if they want to pursue this game at the college level."