Westland Area Commission members said they will begin a letter- and e-mail-writing campaign to Columbus City Council members to increase the chances of having a mega-recreation center built on their end of town.

Westland Area Commission members said they will begin a letter- and e-mail-writing campaign to Columbus City Council members to increase the chances of having a mega-recreation center built on their end of town.

The push to get the facility built along West Broad Street was once again a topic of conversation at the June 18 Westland Area Commission meeting at Doctors West Hospital.

Commission member Jim Kennedy broached the subject of why Columbus City Council has not officially purchased the land for the facility. He urged that the commission seek out those answers immediately.

That parcel of land earmarked for the center is known as the Blausser property and is located along West Broad Street, south of Alton Darby Road. Purchase of the land was expected to occur after the city bond package was passed a few years ago.

"They need to buy this property," Kennedy said. "Money is sitting in the bank. It's like they are reneging on the deal."

Council is again poised to ask voters to pass another bond package in the fall, this one totaling $1.6-billion. If passed, Columbus would then have the funds to build the centers.

Commission members questioned the feasibility of that if Columbus has yet to purchase the land to place them on. Then there is the question of what end of town will receive the first mega center.

Commission member Ashley Hoye said it didn't look good for the West Side.

He said he believed that Columbus would more than likely choose somewhere downtown or the north side as its first picks.

"It doesn't look good for us," Hoye said. "Downtown would be a go and the north side has been waiting longer."

Commission member Jo Ellen Locke said she had to disagree.

She said that regarding the downtown and north side options, those residents have access to surrounding rec centers; the West Side does not. It is that argument that Locke continues to take to city council, she said.

"It looks like we need to have a letter-writing campaign," Commission Chair Mike McKay said. "They have got to move on this. Why things aren't moving, I don't know."

Locke encouraged her fellow commission members to once again confront Columbus City Council. There will be a public meeting at 5:30 p.m. on July 1 at city hall concerning the $1.6-billion bond package.

"We need to get the word out again about the need for this facility," Locke said.

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