Two arrests were made after the caboose and the voting wagon at the Northwest Franklin County Historical Society's Historical Village were vandalized on Aug. 16.

Two arrests were made after the caboose and the voting wagon at the Northwest Franklin County Historical Society's Historical Village were vandalized on Aug. 16.

Nine glass windows and three light fixtures were broken in the incident.

The vandalism was reported to police at 3:36 p.m. Employees of Peabody Landscaping Co. were working at the Historical Village in Weaver Park and witnessed the vandalism. They called the recreation and parks department, who in turn called the police.

Since the Hilliard Division of Police is next to Weaver Park, arrests were made promptly.

According to police, David Berry, 21, and a 14-year-old, both residents of Hilliard, were charged with vandalism.

"Unfortunately, they did extensive damage to the caboose," said Randy Smith, president of the historical society. "I really hate that this occurred. It was senseless. You never know if the individuals will learn from it, but I hope the justice system takes care of them."

Smith said the society's insurance company estimated there was $6,900 in damage to the caboose and $500 to the voting wagon.

Due to the amount of damage, police has changed the charges from a misdemeanor to a felony level, said Police Chief Doug Francis. That means the case will be heard in the Franklin County Court of Common Pleas instead of the mayor's court. The vandals could face prison time and/or make restitution, depending on the sentencing.

"This is just a horrible crime," Francis said. "There's absolutely no reason why these people would do this."

"Everybody is upset about it," said Christy Clark, executive director of Destination Hilliard. "These are historic, original buildings. It's brought the community together to say, how are we going to save this stuff from stuff like this happening?"

Clark said she was hopeful that the repairs could be made before upcoming events in the village like Heritage Day in October and Old Hilliard Christmas.

"This was just bad timing, because the caboose itself is a very popular item in the village," Smith said.

Smith said the society's insurance policy won't cover the total damages, so they will have to start a fundraising campaign to make up the $4,000 shortfall.

"We'll be reaching out to the public to see if they can help us on this so that we can get the caboose and the voting wagon fixed as soon as possible," Smith said.

The society will accept donations in person at the society's office at 5274 Norwich Street, or by mail, Smith said. On the check or envelope, specify that the donation is for the caboose.