Leaders of the Northland Area Business Association and Northland Community Council are increasing their efforts to reach out to areas outside of the neighborhood's traditional boundaries.

Leaders of the Northland Area Business Association and Northland Community Council are increasing their efforts to reach out to areas outside of the neighborhood's traditional boundaries.

At a meeting last week, NABA's board of trustees checked the association's boundaries to make sure they were in line with those in the NCC's bylaws, which include areas outside of I-270 and extends to the New Albany border.

While it was found that NABA's bylaws also include those areas, NABA president Dave Cooper acknowledged that the association traditionally has recruited businesses in the 43229 ZIP code, using I-270 as its northern border, Morse Road as its southern border, Worthington as its western border and the 3-C railroad tracks as its eastern border.

Cooper said NABA was led to examine its boundaries by NCC members who live in the area outside I-270, many of whom have joined the NCC in more recent years.

"There are a lot of areas that were part of subdivisions out there that are now becoming independent," he said. "They're encouraging us to recruit businesses that are in these areas."

Cooper said NABA will turn some of its attention to recruiting businesses in the northeastern portion of Northland and encouraging them to become active members.

"We're going to encourage all of us to recruit new businesses along Hamilton Road," he said.

NCC president Dave Paul said the areas outside of I-270 were listed in the city's Northland Plan II as being part of the NCC's coverage area.

However, he said those areas often get overlooked because different people have different definitions of "Northland," and many residents consider Northland to be only the area immediately surrounding the old Northland Mall site.

"Northland means different things to the Northland community," Paul said. "For us, when we talk about Northland, we try to talk about the entire NCC service area."

Under the NCC's bylaws, the group's northern boundary extends as far north as Shrock Road and Alum Creek and as far east as New Albany. The southern boundary is roughly Morse Road, and the western boundary is the Penn Railroad.

Paul said the NCC has started to focus on newer areas of development recently, particularly following development issues arose at the corner of state Route 161 and Hamilton Road, which caused the NCC to realize that neighborhoods in that area had concerns but weren't represented as members of the NCC.

"It is a fast-growing area," Paul said. "There are some new communities being built there and some existing communities that we haven't reached out to."

He said the NCC needs to make sure that it is working to represent the newer neighborhoods that fall into the organization's service boundaries.

That does present a challenge to the NCC, Paul said, because many of those newer neighborhoods face different challenges than neighborhoods within "historic" Northland.

"I'm hopeful that if we have folks from those communities working with us, we can address those issues and work with the city to resolve them," he said.

Paul said he wouldn't be surprised if, in the future, a new civic group were established by the city to represent neighborhoods outside of I-270, but for now, he said, it's up to the NCC to make sure those residents have a voice.

"We have a role to play in the development of those newer communities outside I-270," Paul said.

jnesbitt@thisweeknews.com