Dave Pfefferle has worked at Frontier Golf in Westerville for seven years, and when he plays a round there he has to worry about his own game and be ready to give pointers to friends who play the course with him.

Dave Pfefferle has worked at Frontier Golf in Westerville for seven years, and when he plays a round there he has to worry about his own game and be ready to give pointers to friends who play the course with him.

He has become a bit of an expert on the breaks, the curves and the windmills of miniature golf.

"I think it's more the curves of the carpet," he said. "When you look at it, it looks flat, but if you ever play it you know that it is not. You have to know where to hit it, how hard to hit it and whether you want to go for the bank or go straight in."

Pfefferle, a 2002 graduate of Westerville North High School and a 2006 graduate of Ashland College, put his knowledge of the Frontier south course to good use for a good cause -- and a world record -- May 24-25. He played 4,729 holes of miniature golf in a 24-hour period to raise money for the Stefanie Spielman Fund for Breast Cancer research. The feat bettered the previous record of 3,035 holes set by Matt Majikas of Sterling, Mass., on May 26-27, 2004, and raised more than $7,000.

"When you work down here and get free miniature golf, you tend to play a lot," Pfefferle said. "I've played a lot of mini golf in my time."

One day last winter, he looked at the Guinness Book of Records online and found Majikas' record. Pfefferle grabbed a calculator and figured Majikas was playing at a pace of completing a hole every 28.46 seconds.

"I came out here and played for four hours straight just to see how fast I could play," Pfefferle said. "I realized if I kept that pace up, I could play 5,000 holes.

"Then I thought I may as well tie it in with a good cause. My mom (Susan Pfefferle) had breast cancer when I was a sophomore in high school, so the Stefanie Spielman Fund really jumped out at me."

"We've always had a very special relationship, but I was definitely touched," Susan said. "One in eight women end up with breast cancer, so there aren't many people who don't know someone in their family or among their friends who have gone through this. I thought it was a really good idea because people know the Stefanie Spielman Fund."

Frontier closed the south course from 10 a.m. May 24 to 10 a.m. May 25 to allow for the record attempt. It kept the north course open for the 24-hour period and donated the profits to the Spielman Fund.

"People came in and donated money while I was playing," Pfefferle said. "One of the coolest things was a man whose wife had passed away from breast cancer came in and said, 'I'm really happy you guys are doing this,' and wrote us a check for $1,000. That was awesome."

Miniature golf isn't a sport that normally is associated with endurance, and Pfefferle wondered if he'd have the stamina to keep going. He ended up averaging 18 holes every five and one-half minutes.

"You're walking around a course, leaning down to place the ball and leaning down to pick it up," Pfefferle said. "I thought maybe 10 hours in I'd be dying. I was amazed at how well I was able to keep going.

"There was a dead time between 4 a.m. and when sun rose where I was really struggling. But when we came down the home stretch, I was really energized."

Pfefferle played 262 rounds and had just finished the 13th hole when time ran out.

He was able to finish most of the holes in two strokes. His best round was a 29 on the 41-par course about 10 hours into the marathon.

"I really wished I had kept track of the holes-in-one because I had to have had about 400 to 500 holes-in-one," Pfefferle said. "I got into the zone. I have an advantage over someone coming in because I've played the course so much. When you play holes that often, you know how to play them."