U.S. Rep. Pat Tiberi has come out strongly against a government-run health care option and cap-and-trade legislation, the controversial proposal that would limit carbon emissions.

U.S. Rep. Pat Tiberi has come out strongly against a government-run health care option and cap-and-trade legislation, the controversial proposal that would limit carbon emissions.

The Republican from Genoa Township, who met with ThisWeek editors and reporters Thursday morning, lamented the financial burden such regulations would place on an already strained economy and the national deficit, which is projected to soar to $9-trillion over the next decade.

He criticized President Barack Obama and congressional Democrats, who are in firm control of the House and Senate, for freezing the GOP out of the process.

Tiberi's views stand in direct contrast to U.S. Rep. Mary Jo Kilroy, the Democrat representing the 15th District, who supports a public health care option and carbon-emission standards, which she believes will create green-energy jobs.

Tiberi's likely opponent in his re-election bid is Democrat Paula Brooks, a Franklin County commissioner.

A four-term congressman seeking re-election next year, Tiberi said House Republicans have submitted a health care reform plan, an alternative to H.R. 3200, to the Congressional Budget Office for appraisal.

Many Republicans, he said, agree on a few health care reform principles: liability, or tort, reform; allowing insurance to be sold across state lines, which would create more competition; creating pools for high-risk populations; eliminating the pre-existing conditions clause; and allowing for portable insurance, which means those who lose or change jobs can keep their existing coverage.

"Quite frankly, we can do some simple things to get the uninsured insured," he said.

Still, "We don't believe there's a silver bullet," he said.

Special-interest groups have attacked Tiberi on TV and radio for his positions on health care reform and cap-and-trade, which the congressman said would cost Ohio 78,000 to 119,000 jobs and raise utility rates by 30 percent.

"Like we can afford that after all the jobs we lost," he said.

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