Two weeks before the March 6 primary, pro-levy Our Community, Our Schools reported spending $25,635 of a more than $48,000 campaign fund.

Two weeks before the March 6 primary, pro-levy Our Community, Our Schools reported spending $25,635 of a more than $48,000 campaign fund.

By contrast, anti-levy Taxpayers for Westerville Schools, bankrolled by LevyFacts, had spent $3,014 of a $6,141 fund.

Those numbers come from pre-primary campaign-finance reports filed with the Franklin County Board of Elections. Post-election reports are due to be filed by April 13.

Our Community, Our Schools and Taxpayers for Westerville Schools were the two main groups who filed reports on Issue 10, the Westerville City Schools' March 6 levy bid.

Issue 10, a 6.71-mill, five-year emergency levy passed by a vote of 51-49 percent.

According to the Our Community, Our Schools report, the campaign carried over $10,731 from the fall levy campaign. An additional $37,504 was raised specifically for the March election.

Many of the campaign contributions came from individuals who donated $100 or less, but there were some larger donors as well.

Nancy McFarland was the largest campaign donor, giving a total of $11,000.

The Westerville Education Association, the union representing Westerville's teachers, donated $10,000. The insurance brokerage firm Arthur J. Gallagher and Co. donated $2,000.

OAPSE Turnaround Ohio donated $1,000. Superintendent Dan Good, Westerville Board of Education President Kevin Hoffman and resident Kelly Pollard each donated $500 to the campaign.

Many of the schools' PTAs also donated to the campaign, in amounts ranging from $25 to $500.

Prior to the Feb. 21 filing deadline, Our Community, Our Schools spent $8,000 on levy consultant Fallon Research and Communications, $4,830 on postage, $3,000 for call services, $525 for postcard printing, $317 for an email campaign, $735 for printing packets and $400 for an information subscription to Support Ohio Schools.

All of the contributions to LevyFacts came from individuals, most in amounts of $200 or less.

The largest contribution, of $500, came from resident Carol Hribar.

Prior to the Feb. 21 deadline, the campaign spent $2,023 on yard signs, $840 on mailing materials, $51 on printing services, $39 on business services and $36 on PayPal.