Developers before the Westerville Planning Commission Aug. 22 painted a picture of a luxury apartment complex off of Worthington and County Line Roads with stainless-steel appliances, a full-service clubhouse and lake views.

Developers before the Westerville Planning Commission Aug. 22 painted a picture of a luxury apartment complex off of Worthington and County Line Roads with stainless-steel appliances, a full-service clubhouse and lake views.

Planning Commission members, however, remained skeptical that the design of the complex is high-end enough to warrant granting the density of 520 apartments on 54 acres west of Alum Creek and north of County Line Road.

The meeting last week was the third consecutive month developers NP Limited and Trivium have appeared before the commission to discuss a preliminary development plan for the site.

No vote was requested, and the issue once again was tabled.

Each time the developers have presented their plans, Planning Commission members and residents have blasted it, saying the development is too big and lacking in architectural detail.

The developers tried to address that this month, bringing site planners, property managers, architects and others before the commission to prove the development's worth.

Now named the "Ravines at Westar," the development would be a gated community with high-end appliances and details, attached garages, walking paths, lake views and a clubhouse with a large pool, media room, DVD library, work space, billiards room, tanning center and fitness area.

"These are all the little things we know will make a difference. That's how we know we'll attract and make a difference at this apartment complex," said John Wymer, president of Oakwood Management, which would manage the property for the owners. "We know our residents will want the upper end here."

The architects, meanwhile, said they are designing apartments with architectural details aimed at giving the complex character and at breaking up its scale.

Chris Meyers, of Meyers and Associates, said his team started with "generic" apartment style and then pushed to incorporate more detail to make the complex look high end.

"This is a complete-site strategy. It's not just a series of facades," Meyers said. "We look at this as a very high-quality design project, certainly within the character of the community."

Despite the presentation, Planning Commission members Aug. 22 again said they did not feel the architecture was up to the standards they would require to grant such a dense development.

"I'm still concerned about the number and quality of the multifamily," said City Councilwoman Diane Fosselman, council's representative on the commission. "I'm not overly impressed with architecture."

The development of a raw piece of land, especially with a large complex, merits higher standards, said commission member Gerald Domanik.

"That kind of density, we expect something extra special," he said. "I think you've coming a long way on it, and I think you're going to go a lot more on it."

"This is one of the few pieces of pure property we have left. You want to get it right."