Even as the first public hearing on the Ohio State University airport noise study is about to take place, the city's consultant and a group of citizens do not agree on the validity of the data used to create the report.

Even as the first public hearing on the Ohio State University airport noise study is about to take place, the city's consultant and a group of citizens do not agree on the validity of the data used to create the report.

The unveiling of the noise exposure maps created as part of the Part 150 Noise Study will take place from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the airport this Thursday, April 24. A formal presentation is set for 7:30 p.m., and public input will be taken.

"This is an opportunity for us to give input and believe me, I will," Olentangy River Road resident Kim Nixon-Bell told Worthington City Council at its Monday meeting.

The Part 150 Noise Study was undertaken by the airport, with the support of the FAA, at the request of council.

Hundreds of residents had complained to the city about the noise generated by the Northwest side airport. They were particularly concerned with plans to lengthen the north runway and otherwise expand the airport, also known as Don Scott Field.

Toledo attorney David Zoll was hired five years ago to represent the city.

On Monday night, he reported that he was satisfied with the work done on the Noise Study thus far.

The airport consultants collected data concerning the type of aircraft using the airport, the frequency of the aircrafts' flights, and the flight paths and altitudes.

That input will be used to create the noise contour maps which will be revealed on Thursday, and upon which future decisions about noise control will be based.

"I am generally satisfied that the study has been conducted properly, and that the community can have confidence in the result," he told council.

Nixon-Bell and Scott Whitlock are not as satisfied.

The pair of Worthington neighbors have watched closely and checked the work of the airport consultants as work progressed on the Noise Study.

Last January, the consultants had to completely redo their completed fleet mix report after realizing that Nixon-Bell and Whitlock were correct in pointing out a substantial error. The new report used a different data base than the one used the first time.

The new data base was generated by the Columbus Regional Airport Authority (CRAA), which Zoll said is the most complete data base available.

"No one claims 100 percent of the flights were picked up, the claim is that nearly all of the flights are picked up and the fleet mix is reasonable," Zoll told council.

That is not good enough, Nixon-Bell said. She and Whitlock tested the input data and found their test results did not match the consultants'.

She asked council to hire someone to look at their information.

"The importance of this being accurate cannot be emphasized enough," she said.

Council did not agree to hire another consultant, but at least one member did express his concern about the value of the Noise Study.

"We pushed for the 150 Study because it was presented as the gold standard by which we can make decisions," said council member Bob Chosy. "It is more like the aluminum standard."

Zoll disagreed.

"It is the best that can be done in the United States of America today," he said.

"That's pathetic," Chosy replied.

Zoll did acknowledge that residents will probably not be satisfied with the noise contour maps that will be revealed on Thursday.

The maps reflect the noise levels around the airport currently and the levels that can be expected in the future.

"The people will believe the noise maps are wrong because they don't see the interference with their lives the way they see them," Zoll told council.