A 26-year-old newcomer has announced his candidacy for a seat on Worthington City Council, but will one of his opponents be the elder statesman of Worthington government?

A 26-year-old newcomer has announced his candidacy for a seat on Worthington City Council, but will one of his opponents be the elder statesman of Worthington government?

As of press time on Tuesday, Louis Goorey acknowledged but did not answer questions about his plans for the November council race. The president for more than a decade, Goorey has served on council for 35 years.

Insiders say he is still undecided.

Goorey, 76, is a retired pediatrician who has served on council since 1973.

Council member John Butterfield also has not decided if he will seek a second term on council, but fellow incumbents Michael Duffey and David Foust say they intend to run in the fall.

The new name in the contest is Doug Smith, 26, of 1163 Eastfield Road. A graduate of Capital University, Smith has lived in central Ohio for 10 years and in Worthington for three, he said.

Smith said he has the energy to perform the job correctly.

"Sometimes people get stagnant in those positions," he said.

Smith is part owner of a marketing and strategic planning firm called Blue Streak Strategies. The company owns The New Standard, a Jewish newspaper in central Ohio.

He also has a federal grant to educate students about making "healthy choices" regarding sex, relationships, drugs, alcohol and risk-taking. He and two women speak at schools. The grant came from the Bush administration, and it is uncertain what will happen to it during the Obama years, he said.

Smith said he has been walking door-to-door meeting Worthington residents.

"I fell in love with the city and the people in it and want to carry on with Worthington's greatness," he said.

Butterfield said he is still considering whether he will seek reelection. The former director of the Worthington Area Chamber of Commerce and former Worthington schools administrator was first elected to council four years ago.

Foust was elected two years ago, when he was asked by former long-time council member Lou Briggs to step up to the job when she left.

He has become a middle-of-the-road peacemaker during many of council's recent disagreements, a role he would be pleased to continue to play.

"I was asked to serve, I am not a politician," Foust said. "If the community thinks I am doing a good job, I am glad to serve. If they don't, they can elect someone else."

Foust is an engineer who served many years on the Municipal Planning Commission and Architectural Review Board.

Duffey is also finishing his first term, having been elected in 2005 after failed attempts in 2001 and 2003. He is more of a maverick on council, sometimes casting lone votes, but nearly always voicing a financially conservative viewpoint.

Each time he ran in the past, he said the issues were all about the budget. With income taxes taking a nosedive in recent months, council must soon make some difficult decisions about whether to raise taxes or cut services, he said.

"My position is we've got to deal with it, stop postponing it," he said. "We do not want to wait and make it worse later. Let the people decide for themselves what they want to do."

A public relations executive, Duffey is the son of long-time council member John Duffey.