I had just started to take the wholesomeness of Worthington for granted when I heard the bang of drums and the twang of the guitar. It called to me, in a good way.

To the editor:

I had just started to take the wholesomeness of Worthington for granted when I heard the bang of drums and the twang of the guitar. It called to me, in a good way.

"There's no way that's the U.S. Army Field Band playing, I would have expected marching band music," I said to my 13-year-old as we read the wooden sign posted on the Village Green. But there the band members were dressed in fatigues and starred Army tees, jammin' away at Kansas, Doobie Brothers, Motown tunes and other standards.

It was a full house -- or lawn in this case. With it being Father's Day, I wasn't surprised the crowd was full of families, but there were many a white-haired couple, too. And even with the '70s and up rock-n-roll type tunes being the majority of songs played, the seniors remained for the full hour-and-a-half performance, holding hands in their ribbon fold-up chairs.

The lead male singer had a great pair of pipes; he could sing high and low, nailing all the parts many an American Idol contender could not reach. The lead female singer was great as well and charmed the crowd by giving a shout out to her Marine father and inviting her two daughters to come sing a sweet chorus line of, "You're beautiful just as you are!"

There were kids dancing on the brick patio, one in bunny ears -- in June. As I clapped my hands to the beat and people watched, I was overwhelmed with the joy expressed on the audience members' faces.

What a gift to have free Sunday evening summer concerts in our town. I forgot how charming Worthington is, but thanks to music in the air I was reminded. (Oh, and by the way, John Butterfield's toddling granddaughter is the cutest little thing ever.)

I hope you all make it to one of the Concerts on the Green this summer. They are a blessing to our community!

Jen Richards
Worthington

Spend time on budget, not chickens

To the editor:

There have been articles in the paper regarding the request of Worthington City Council to consider rewriting the ordinance concerning allowing backyard chickens. Some of us who attended the council meeting on June 8 were discouraged that the feedback from four of the council members seemed to agree that possibly the ordinance should be rewritten to be less restrictive of the 150-feet rule from a neighbor's residence. There were also members from the Sustainable Worthington group at the meeting who stressed their positive arguments about raising chickens in their backyard.

I feel there are many compelling arguments against allowing chickens to be closer than 150 feet from a neighbor, some of them listed as odor, possible loss of real estate value, attraction to rats from chicken feed and deposits, and surrounding neighbors who own dogs which are natural predators of chickens. I urge you to write council if you research the issue, as many of the opponents have done, and elaborate on the views that you hold. You can also get on a mailing list with Janet Anderson with the Worthington City Council (Anderson@ci.worthington.oh.us) so that you can be kept informed of the agendas for council meetings, and be aware of when the chicken ordinance is being discussed. There are many Worthington residents who have gathered valid evidence of the opposing arguments for changing with ordinance, and if you are interested, there would be some contact people you could be referred to.

If the council is swayed by this backyard chicken movement that seems to be very organized through online information and magazines, I would ask that council members strongly consider following the permit process that was adopted by Ann Arbor, and request that approval will only be given by getting written consent from all adjacent property owners that they are agreeing to allow chickens and a chicken coop in an adjacent property. I would hope that a clause could be added that allows for any owner that moves in after the written consent of a previous owner would also have to consent as the present owner.

It is frustrating to me that in a city that faces possible service cuts because of a shortfall, and in a city with a school district that faces cuts because the levy didn't pass, that the city would devote this much time and effort, and will continue to do so, if the ordinance is passed. These actions would be taken in spite of the fact that a small minority of residents (22 permits issued for backyard poultry in the city of Columbus since 2003) would take advantage of raising chickens. I would prefer that council spend its time on reviewing its budget, rather than pleasing a very small vocal group of backyard chicken activists.

Patty Benninger
Worthington

Linworth tracks need an additional warning

To the editor:

The recent experience of the truck driver trapped on the railroad tracks in Linworth reminds me of a similar experience I had there, but being in a car, I was able to pull sideways, off the tracks. I am suggesting some addition to the traffic lights, west of the railroad tracks, that would warn drivers the light at the upcoming intersection of Linworth and Rt. 161 is going red, and signs would make it mandatory to stop before the tracks, going east. This could be similar to blinking lights on four-lane highways that tell you a traffic light ahead is turning red, so you are prepared to stop.If that sounds too complicated, how about a sign that directs you to "Not Block the Railroad Tracks," similar to signs telling you to not block intersections.

Nancy Mily
Worthington